Interactive

Manufacturing and technology giants Samsung, Hyundai, SK and LG are examples of chaebol – multinational Korean conglomerates with labyrinthine ownership structures, often controlled by the founding family. Use our interactive graphic to explore the relationships between companies in each chaebol Read more

US prosecutors are offering immunity deals to junior traders in London as they try to gather evidence against banks and more senior staff in the investigation into alleged currency market manipulation. The Forex scandal is, at its core, a story about alleged wrongful sharing of information to boost trading profits. In this interactive, the FT has compiled 30 foreign exchange traders and sales staff who so far have been suspended, placed on leave or fired amid regulatory investigations that started in 2013. Read more

FT Baseline

Which pieces are the most likely to be captured in the early rounds? What about the longest survivors? Which remain fringe actors early on before being thrown into the action as the stakes rise? Read more

By John Burn-Murdoch and Gavin Jackson

Pity the white queen’s pawn. It tends to survive only one in every four games.

That statistic comes from an analysis of 2.2m master-level tournament games conducted by Oliver Brennan. But statistical analysis has found that overall white wins about 37 per cent of the time to Black’s 28 per cent. Read more

They cost billions of dollars, symbolise economic power and are photographed by millions, but the world’s tallest buildings also compete on a lesser known measure that pushes the limits of modern engineering: elevator speed. These ultra-fast lifts can reach speeds of 20 metres per second (45 mph) and feature technologies that use heat resistant brakes, mitigate excess vibration and adjust for air pressure to prevent ear blockages. Our graphic shows the top speeds of elevators in eight of the world’s tallest and most famous buildings, and how far they have traveled since this web page loaded Read more

By John Burn-Murdoch and Gavin Jackson

In the latest instalment of The Baseline, our weekly feature on sports statistics, we looked ahead to the ATP Tour Finals, the climax of the men’s tennis season.

The tournament is played on a hard court surface, which goes some way to nullifying the relative advantages afforded to big serving and big returning players by grass and clay courts respectively. But where exactly does hard court fall between those two extremes, and what can this tell us about its impact on the playing styles of grass and clay specialists? Read more