The current Ebola virus outbreak has claimed more than 4,000 lives in West Africa, as well as one in the US where the victim had been visiting Liberia, the country with the highest death toll so far.

Our interactive graphic tracks the outbreak’s spread since the World Health Organisation first issued a global alert in March 2014

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By John Burn-Murdoch and Gavin Jackson

In the latest instalment of The Baseline, our weekly feature on sports statistics, we looked at Serena Williams’ dominance of women’s tennis over the last decade.

Williams has won 17 of the 43 grand slam tournaments she has entered since the 2002 French Open, and the reasons for her success can be explained with a look at performance data for the top players of the modern era Read more

By John Burn-Murdoch and Gavin Jackson

In the fourth instalment of The Baseline, our weekly feature on sports statistics, we looked at how overtaking in Formula One has changed over the years.

For decades it appeared the aggressive passing move was a dying art, but everything changed in 2011. Read on to find out why, and what it means for this year’s title tussle between Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg. Read more

by Gavin Jackson and Keith Fray

On Tuesday the International Monetary Fund released its latest World Economic Outlook. A striking new finding emerges: the seven largest emerging markets are now bigger, in gross domestic product terms, than the long established G7 group of industrialised nations, when measured at purchasing power parity (PPP). Read more

No one knows how many Chinese people live in Europe.

The United Nations estimated Europe’s China-born population at 886,882 in 2010, its most recent count, while Chinese-based social scientists put it somewhere between 2m and 3m.

Why, in the age of big data, is there so much uncertainty where our neighbours are from? Read more

FT Baseline

By John Burn-Murdoch and Gavin Jackson

In the third instalment of The Baseline, our weekly feature on sports statistics, we looked at how much we can learn about the final outcome of the Premier League from the season so far.

For the story click here, or keep reading to find out how we worked it out. Read more

This weekend the FT Weekend Magazine publishes its first guide to all things gastronomic in the French capital. All the articles – on fine dining, natural wine bars, street markets, specialist coffee hangouts, food politics and more – can be found on the magazine’s website.

The interactive map below shows the locations of more than 100 restaurants, bars, shops and cafes listed in the magazine.

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Simon Greaves

The price of salad is about to jump after prices for olive oil, lettuce and tomatoes have soared following a lengthy drought in Spain. Read more

FT Baseline

You drive for show and putt for dough. Or do you? We analysed data from the PGA Tour to test golf’s great aphorism Read more

By John Burn-Murdoch and Aleksandra Wisniewska

Scotland voted on Thursday to remain in the United Kingdom, with the pro-union camp securing 55.3 per cent of the vote. Read more

Based on the voter registration data and the Press Association’s estimated declaration times, here is an approximate timetable of what to expect during the night of the count Read more

FT Baseline

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It’s impossible to know just how seriously to take the polling for the Scottish independence referendum. Pollsters haven’t had the same opportunity to calibrate their forecasts through trial and error while observers don’t have a past record to go on, and as we reported yesterday, there’s a lot of disagreement between them. Read more

By Tom Burgis, Caroline Nevitt, and Martin Stabe

Chinese investment in postwar Angola set the template for major infrastructure deals in Africa over the past decade. FT’s Tom Burgis explains Beijing’s quest for a continent’s resources. Read more

Interactive map by Jennifer Bissell

The interactive map below, based on data from International Rivers, shows the 24 dam projects in Africa that involve either Chinese sources of finance or Chinese developers or construction firms.

Base map design: Mapbox, Base map data: OpenStreetMap contributors

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In news that will delight statisticians everywhere the distinction between the mean and the median finally has the political profile it deserves.

Yesterday Sir Andrew Dilnot, chair of the UK statistical authority, wrote a letter clarifying an ongoing debate between Labour and Conservative politicians on waiting times in accident and emergency rooms. Read more

So the UK economy grew 0.8 per cent in the second quarter of 2014, leaving output on this preliminary estimate at just about the previous peak set in Q1 2008, over six years ago. For an economy that produces almost £400bn a quarter in gross domestic product, exceeding the previous peak by £752m is really small beer, as our first chart below the break shows.

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Keith Fray

The UK economy has finally recovered. Today’s estimate by the Office for National Statistics of gross domestic product for the second quarter takes output (adjusted for inflation) to a new high, above the level of the first quarter of 2008*.

Hurrah. But, although welcome, this is nothing to celebrate. The government will not be ordering church bells to be rung. That the sum total of everything produced in the economy is only now returning to the levels of six years ago is astonishing. To give some context, the recession and recovery have lasted about nine months longer than the second world war. Read more

Since 2008, the Tier 1 (General) visa has allowed 33,756 people to come to the UK as highly skilled migrants. They brought 47,535 dependents with them.

On December 22nd, 2010, the visa route was closed to new overseas applicants.

For those who came to the UK on this visa and have been here for five years, there is one last test to pass in order to be allowed to stay in the UK indefinitely – without further visa restrictions.

Would you qualify to stay in the UK as a highly skilled migrant?

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