Surveys and Polls

On Monday, the FT began publishing a four-day series about the growing international backlash against US technology companies.

The first part focused on how Silicon Valley has embarked on a charm offensive in the wake of growing concerns about their role in US government surveillance and how they use their customers’ data. Part two highlighted the situation in Germany, which is leading the European regulatory push-back against big US tech groups. Part three was about how the NSA scandal has led to a crackdown on online freedoms.

We included an online survey with these stories asking readers how they have changed their web habits in the past year due to privacy concerns. (The survey is now closed and is no longer embedded in the online articles). 

The 2013 British Social Attitude survey, released today, mainly focuses on questions of national identity and alongside asking everyone about questions on immigration and Britishness, asks Scots specifically a set of questions about their attitudes to nationhood and independence. 

With the US presidential election race coming to an end tomorrow (we hope!), it is time to take one last one last look at the RealClearPolitics (RCP) poll average and the Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM) winner-take-all contracts and see where things stand.

We’re including one more data set this time just to give an additional picture – Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight model, which has become the source of quite a bit of contention.

One thing to point out about the IEM that we mentioned in the initial post – the contracts represent a probability, as does the much-cited FiveThirtyEight model that we’ll look at later in this post. That means that as it stands in the IEM, Obama is the favourite but far from a sure thing.

The RCP poll average appears neck and neck:

 

Kate Allen

What have Georgia, Rwanda and Belarus got in common? According to the World Bank’s annual Doing Business project, which has been running for nearly a decade, these are the fastest improving countries in which to do business.

The most surprising inclusion for the outsider is obviously Rwanda. The central African nation has changed greatly since the horrific genocide in 1994-1995 for which it is most notorious. Just days ago, it took up a seat on the UN Security Council. And it is attempting to reduce its reliance on foreign aid donors, focusing instead on raising its own funding.

Most improved countries in which to do business since 2005 

When we started these posts for the 2012 election season, the goal was to give a purely numbers-driven look at the presidential election – a respite from the noise. Not that the media coverage isn’t useful, however it can be occasionally useful to turn off the noise and just look at the data.

Let’s get a sense of the polls for the last month and a half. Each of these graphs looks at the race(s) from September 1 to mid October.

Real Clear Politics (RCP)

Now that’s what I call volatility. After being in a dead heat in early September, Obama built a lead that hovered in the 3-4 point range for much of the month. The October 3 debate was seen as an important turning point, giving Romney some sorely needed momentum. It is important to note, however, that he had been trending up in the days preceding the event.

To the market!

Iowa Electronic Market (IEM)