Earlier this week the charity Oxfam released a paper ahead of the world economic forum in Davos that claimed that the wealthiest 1 per cent of the world’s population were on track to own half the world’s wealth by 2016.

Others have pointed out problems with this data. To calculate an individual’s wealth the Credit Suisse data takes debts away from assets to give a figure for net wealth. Anyone with debts greater than their assets has negative wealth. Read more

By David Blood and Aleksandra Wisniewska

More than 2,500 people are attending the World Economic Forum in Davos this week, but how are they connected outside of the picturesque alpine town?

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156 players have reached the top ten of the ATP men’s singles rankings since they were established in 1973. How do they compare on success and longevity?

Find out in our interactive graphic Read more

 

 

The weakening rouble and the recession will cause a 24-per cent contraction in new cars sales in Russia this year, to the levels last seen in 2009. Read more

 

All ten of the areas that saw the biggest increases in their share of British jobs since 1978 are in the service sector, with the majority being among those in the caring professions and those providing professional services.

 

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Before the 1980s the rate at which the US imprisoned people wasn’t particularly high but after the closure of mental hospitals, the rate of violent crime began to increase and soon after so did the rate at which it imprisoned people. However there are differences between mental health patients and the prison population, the former tended to be more likely to be women, white and older whereas the prison population is more likely to be young, black and male. Read more

The UK’s ‘two speed’ housing market is not a novel concept, but new figures highlight the regional and political split like never before.

Use our interactive graphic to explore how geography and politics divide fortunes in Britain’s property market. Read more

Renewables outstripped lignite, the most polluting form of coal, as Germany’s top power source for the first time ever in 2014.

This was a big milestone for the country’s energy transition, or Energiewende, which aims to use renewables for 80 per cent of Germany’s energy needs by 2050, and to stop using nuclear energy by 2022. Read more

The conflict in Ukraine has pushed the country’s inflation to a 14-year high. Consumer prices rose by nearly a quarter in 2014 and fruits now cost one and a half times more than a year ago.

One of the reasons for the drastic rise in the CPI inflation rate – from 0.5 per cent in 2013 to 24.9 per cent last year – was the government raising higher tariffs on natural gas and other services to fight the deficit. Read more

Lines of succession in the House of Saud Read more

The global crisis left many economies heavily indebted. But there are ways policy makers can repair the damage Read more

Losses of large ships have been steadily declining over the past decade; 94 ships of more than 100 gross tons were lost at sea in 2013, down 45 percent from 2003.

Most accidents in the Northern Hemisphere occur in January whereas July is the worst month in the Southern Hemisphere. Read more

It is said that money makes the world go round, but in football’s transfer market we can be a little more specific on that money’s provenance. Our interactive graphic explores the net spend of the 265 clubs in world football to have each spent £10m or more in total since 1980, grouped by country.

Any guesses on the identity of the country whose clubs spend the most? Read more

A breakdown of all of the recepients in this year’s list Read more

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The monetary and fiscal stimulus initiated by Shinzo Abe, the prime minister, over the last two years was sufficient to push inflation up closer to the Bank of Japan’s target of 2 per cent by April 2015, after decades of low inflation and deflation. Read more

Statistics suggest that it is was never a successful tactic beyond gaining short term momentum Read more

Parkview Gardens, a short subway ride from the White House, is an unlikely home of the free and the brave.

Half of the 600 apartments in this red-brick housing estate in Maryland are rented by refugees, people who have fled trouble and now live in the US. Many consider themselves lucky. They have visas, they get some government aid, and they are safe. But all offer some hard realities: nothing is easy about beginning again.

Five families – from Iraq, Bhutan, Rwanda and Kosovo – tell the Financial Times about their past lives and what they face now in America and living at Parkview Gardens. Click here for their stories (free)

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Norwegian salmon prices dipped last week after increasing sharply in the past month — they are still up 30 per cent since September — despite Russia’s retaliation against EU and US sanctions and helped by soaring seasonal demand for the Christmas and new year holidays.

Prices have been falling as warm seas, which increase fish growth rates, led to larger quantities coming on to the market earlier in the year than expected, according to Mintec, the commodities data analysts, but fewer fish are currently being kept on farms.

In May the volume on farms was up 10 per cent year-on-year but the stocks fell, however, to only 1 per cent ahead in October and are expected to have fallen even further in November, the analysts said. Read more

On average, 18 per cent of the population of an EU country have never used the internet, according to a Eurostat survey. Romania has the highest percentage of non-users, with 39 per cent. Iceland has the lowest at 1 per cent. Read more

There are signs that the 40 per cent fall in oil prices might not deliver the expected stimulus. Chris Giles assesses the outlook for the global economy while FT reporters look at the prospects for key exporters and importers.

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