Monthly Archives: August 2011

And so the McQueen blockbuster has finally come to an end, the most successful fashion show the Metropolitan Museum has ever put on. So where, inquiring minds want to know, will it go next? No where. Apparently, unlike almost every other cultural arena, from theatre to musicals to music to books to film to other museum shows, a sell-out fashion show is not a transferable proposition. Yeah, right. And I have a bridge I can sell you. 

Hoo-ha in the US yesterday not just about plunging stocks, but plunging model ages, as Good Morning America discovered that French Vogue and other such mags have been putting a 10 year old -gasp – in their pages. Now what was once a rumbling within fashion has burst out into the world of public opinion and opprobrium, but what the critics should be asking is not “Is this appropriate?” but rather, “Does the sort of shoot actually do what it is supposed to do — move product?”

 

Is the fact that IMF chief Christine Lagarde has made Vanity Fair’s International best-dressed list good or bad for the image of bankers? Though at first I was excited about the news — yay! A female banker has finally been acknowledged for sartorial prowess; the “boring” stereotype is broken — after sleeping on it, I actually think this one could backfire.

 

If you don’t know Nicola Formichetti, aka the artist formerly known as Lady Gaga’s stylist, you will very soon. He has plans for world domination. Not I didn’t say fashion world domination. He’s gone way beyond that.

 

If ever a man tried to telegraph the fact he was stuck between two competing factions via his tie, it’s Barack Obama.

 

Sir Isaac Newton said it first (actually, he said it third, if we are being specific): for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. So it should come as no surprise that after the soaring popularity of internet sale sites such as Gilt, Rue La La, and Ideeli, to name a few of the much-talked-about, cut-price, get-it-now-or-lose-out-forever-etailers, comes a new raft of sites geared not toward making high-end goods accessible to the masses, but rather helping the very few become even more elite. 

Is there a difference between European and American luxury? And if so, does it have to do with aesthetics, or markets? I’ve been pondering this ever since the news broke that, after a year of rumours, Andrew Rosen, the great NY garmento who founded Theory and re-invented Helmut Lang, and John Howard of Irving Place Capitol (a fashion-focused private equity fund) finally bought Permira’s stake in US brand Proenza Schouler.