Womenswear

What is a gown? And where does such an extravagant garment belong in a world of denim and parkas?

No-one can reinvent sportswear quite like Alexander Wang. Renowned for his urban aesthetic, the American designer’s hotly-anticipated collaboration with H&M blends practical performance wear with fresh tailoring. Read more

Dolce & Gabbana SS15  © Catwalking

From crimson lips, to acid-bright eyes, to oil-slick hair, here are the biggest trends for Spring Summer 2015. Read more

This September's Vogue Italia cover  © VOGUE

Quite what the collective noun for models might be is debatable (a symmetry? A perfection?). But we should find one, because model gangs are owning the September issues. Read more


The luxury M&A rumour mill has gone into overdrive yet again amid reports that LVMH is looking to acquire a minority stake in bright young New York fashion brand Proenza Schouler.

Although the terms of any potential deal have not been disclosed, people familiar with the situation said that LVMH was looking to take as much as 40 per cent in the label, which was founded in 2002 by designer duo Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez.

Proenza Schouler’s current group of investors is spearheaded by Theory supremo Andrew Rosen and John Howard of Irving Place Capital, also the powerhouses behind cult contemporary label Rag & Bone. Read more

The Honourable Woman, the political thriller currently reaching its apogee on the BBC, makes a compelling case for the continuing influence of minimalist power dressing. Hugo Blick’s eight-part conspiracy drama, rather dishonourably squandered within the holiday doldrums of the summer schedules (and now airing to US audiences on the Sundance channel), features such sumptuously luxuriously spare tailoring, svelte silhouettes and form-skimming power skirts that one could argue that the Célinification (so named after the influential label headed by the 41-year-old designer Phoebe Philo) of the moneyed elite is now complete. At least onscreen.

 

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And so that extended and amorphous season known as “Cruise” or “Pre-fall” – you know, the clothes that go on sale in late October/November, and hang around until February, and thus constitute the bulk of a brand’s winter revenues — has semi-officially kicked off. Last night the Dior juggernaut came to Brooklyn for a show in the Navy Yards before a few thousand retailers, press and clients. Mostly clients. Which makes sense, right? They’re the buyers. Shouldn’t they see it first? Direct communication (direct sales?) ahoy! Read more

“Why does the Met Ball matter?” — this question was asked of me by a British colleague recently, who had gotten tired, I suppose, of revisiting the subject every year with me. And it’s a fair question: why does this gala, of all galas, get so much international attention? I mean, it squishes all benefit competitors in the social media game. It’s not just because of the celebrities, such as Gwyneth Paltrow, left, at last year’s Ball – there are celebs at the NYCB gala, coming up Thursday, and Elton John’s White Tie & Tiara Ball. It’s not because there’s so much news-worthy behaviour behind the closed doors (it’s on a Monday night; half the crowd go home to bed after the main course). Rather, I think it’s because it’s current maestro, Anna Wintour, understood something about it that no other benefit chairperson, as far as I can tell, has understood about their yearly event. Read more

Next week begins the pre-spring season, starting with Dior in NYC, followed by Chanel in Dubai, Louis Vuitton in Monaco and everyone else in their home towns. Everyone, that is, except Celine’s Phoebe Philo, who just released images of her pre-FALL collection (here’s a peek, sprinkled throughout this blog). Got that? Everyone is doing pre-spring, and she is doing pre-fall. In other words, Ms Philo did that very shocking thing that keeps getting discussed within the fashion world as a way to stop counterfeiting and satisfy consumers, who want what they want when they see it (not six months later), but never actually acted upon, which is: she did not let anyone see her collection until it was in stores. Read more