Carine Roitfeld

What’s been happening over the last two weeks? What’s the news we can use? Here are my top three recent titbits — the ones that at first glance don’t seem so important, but on second look have outsize implications, from NY Fashion Week’s first casuality to Prada’s new super-expensive perfume, and the rise of the magazine brand as star.
 

Ex-French Vogue editor Carine Roitfeld’s transformation into brand is now complete: she has revealed her new magazine, due out next September to coincide with fashion weeks, will be called….wait for it…CR. Once upon a time if you were forced to leave one job, you looked around for another, but Ms Roitfeld offers an alternative career blueprint. The question is whether it will become the norm? 

In case anyone harboured any doubts about Emmanuelle Alt’s French Vogue resembling Carine Roitfeld’s French Vogue In Any Way, Ms Alt has apparently decided to put them to rest by creating the following inexplicable video, starring herself, the French TV personality Mlle Agnes, and assorted models, all looking seriously dorky, to launch the mag’s new website.

 

Finally, an answer to the Biggest Question In Fashion. No not who’s taking over at Dior, but what Carine Roitfeld will do after French Vogue. Since she left her position of editor last year and was succeeded by Emmanuelle Alt, there have been rumours flying about her next move, from working with Tom Ford to heading up a French edition of Harpers Bazaar.  

Forget all that stuff about old media fashion editors being threatened by the presence of bloggers in various fashion show front rows – that was SO last season. This season, as New York fashion week kicks off (whoopee!!! ), it’s all about old media taking on old media. 

International has finally named a new editor for French Vogue after former editor Carine Roitfeld resigned pre-xmas. Emmanuelle Alt, Ms Roitfeld’s tall, skinny, jeans-and-stiletto-wearing, not-so-mini-me fashion director has gotten her ex-boss’s job. 

Yesterday Ruth La Ferla wrote a provocative story in the NYT about the rise of the fashion editor as star. That’s a big deal, but what she didn’t say was what this meant for the glossies that employ them: bad news.