Gucci

And so the McQueen blockbuster has finally come to an end, the most successful fashion show the Metropolitan Museum has ever put on. So where, inquiring minds want to know, will it go next? No where. Apparently, unlike almost every other cultural arena, from theatre to musicals to music to books to film to other museum shows, a sell-out fashion show is not a transferable proposition. Yeah, right. And I have a bridge I can sell you. 

Blame it on the skinny model controversy and just wanting to avoid the issue entirely. Or maybe just boredom. But summer, it seems, has spawned some lateral thinking in the fashion world about where a brand should put its clothes.

 

Well, this is a shocker: today a digital think tank called L2 is publishing a study, “L2 Prestige 100®: Facebook IQ,” which ranks the high-end brands as “Genius, gifted, average, challenged, and feeble” according to who uses Facebook best, and out of brands that span the auto, watch & jewellery, fashion, beauty, and spirits & champagne sectors, Burberry, normally held up as THE most web-savvy, digi-forward company in the luxury industry, ranks…average. Actually, it’s number 49.
 

Euromonitor has a new report out, and this one’s a doozy: it says Poland is the world’s fourth fastest growing luxury market behind China.  

Along with their 2010 results today Gucci Group announced some big changes – starting with the fact there is no Gucci Group any more. Now there is the “luxury division” of PPR. So: new look/new logo, or something more significant?

Well, along with the name change, come corporate changes: all the GG – oops, no, can’t say that – the LD (?) CEOs will report directly to PPR chieftain Francois-Henri Pinault, and the former CEO of GG, Robert Polet, who just last year moved from London to Switzerland for the Group (starting gossip on the street about all this), will move on yet again, this time to the fabled “new challenges.” 

Does retail need retailers? This is not a rhetorical question. Mark Lee, the CEO of Barney’s, has finally appointed his Woman’s Fashion Director, thus completing his makeover of the store’s executive suite.  

Which companies will get a business bounce from last night’s Golden Globes? The pictures have been sent round the world, and will play out not just today, or throughout the week in various newspapers and weekly gossip mags, but for months as other glossies re-visit celebrity looks of the year. 

A pretty provocative paper comes from a group of INSEAD professors, albeit with a less-than-pretty title: PERFORMANCE IMPLICATIONS OF OUTWARD PERSONNEL MOBILITY IN CREATIVE INDUSTRIES. It looks at the question of whether the talent drain in fashion houses – or the tendency of designers to occasionally jump ship – is actually, as has been posited in the past, a bad thing, and concludes….wait for it…not necessarily.  

We all know children are the future, but at least two brands in Gucci Group apparently think they will play a significant role in the conglomerate’s financial future too. Today Gucci announced they will launch kids’ collections in November, while earlier Stella McCartney spilled the same news. Stella, of course, already had two very successful test runs with kids’ collections for Gap, so her decision to take the profits in-house isn’t really a surprise. Gucci, on the other hand, is entering the market with a splash — and a couple of big assumptions about consumer behaviour that may, or may not, be true.

Jennifer Lopez for Gucci -- copyright Gucci

Jennifer Lopez for Gucci — copyright Gucci

 

The Interbrand 100 best global brands list 2010 just came out, and there was some interesting (or depressing, depending on your perspective), movement in the luxury rankings.