It’s raining women bishops! Hallelujah!

A small step forward for humanity: another bastion of sexism has crumbled – the General Synod of the Church of England has decided to allow women bishops, 14 years after ordaining women priests. As a dyed-in-the-wool Protestant, I would have preferred a solution that did away with all priests and bishops, but if we are going to have them at all, let’s have them of either gender or none.

There are reported to be as many as 1333 clergy who have threatened to leave the Church of England if they are not given legal safeguards to set up a network of parishes that would remain under male leadership. I really don’t want these theological sad sacks to leave. They are misguided and deeply offensive in their insistence that women be barred from leadership positions in the Church of England, but the Church should be broad and tolerant enough to accommodate a small Conan-the-Barbarian wing. I actually doubt that very many would leave, even if they did not get their MCP reservation inside the Church, because they are unlikely to be sent on their way with a pro-rated share of the Church assets.

The next step will be a lesbian bishop in a committed relationship. Then a female Archbishop of Canterbury, straight or gay, with or without a beard. DV I will see the day. Progress is made one small step at a time.

Maverecon: Willem Buiter

Willem Buiter's blog ran until December 2009. This blog is no longer active but it remains open as an archive.

Professor of European Political Economy, London School of Economics and Political Science; former chief economist of the EBRD, former external member of the MPC; adviser to international organisations, governments, central banks and private financial institutions.

Willem Buiter's website

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