Daily Archives: July 30, 2009

Myha Truong

This is our "intake" centre and the hub of our operations. The centre is where all interpreter requests are taken, co-ordinated and dispatched.  The centre operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and reflects the Multilingual Community Interpreter Services' commitment to serve the needs of those with limited English and non-English speaking people in accessing social services, especially individuals experiencing domestic violence and sexual assault.

The centre is where all interpreter requests are taken, coordinated and dispatched. The centre operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and reflects the Multilingual Community Interpreter Services' commitment to serve the needs of limited and non-English speaking persons in accessing social services, especially individuals experiencing domestic violence and sexual assault.

To date, my professional career has been a series of occupations that would invariably draw blank stares and a litany of questions when I tell (highly educated) people what I do for a living.

When I worked as an urban planner, I was often asked if I planted trees for a living. Things did not improve when I became a policy advisor in the areas of municipal management and housing. I was repeatedly asked if being a policy advisor meant that I was a secretary.

You can imagine the fun I am having this time around when I tell people I am interning as a strategy consultant for a non-profit social enterprise. What puzzles people the most is not my job title, but rather the term non-profit social enterprise. While most people understand what a non-profit organisation is they are less knowledgable about social enterprises. I will be honest and admit that, a few months ago, I too was one of these individuals. Read more

Abhay Nihalani

Market research in the traditional business setting is a breeze. Purchase some Nielsen or Forrester reports, run some customer focus groups, analyse your competitors’ financial statements, mine some retail data – and you’ve got the general patterns and trends you need to make a solid strategic business decision.

Much of my work in Kenya has focused on understanding the market and the needs related to maternity health and determining how to establish a sustainable model to provide quality health services to low-income women before, during and after labour. But where to begin? We have no market research reports. There are no systems to capture consumer data.

Reading scholarly journals and World Health Organisation white papers will only get me so far (really not very far at all). In order to understand the health marketplace for poor consumers, I must see it with my own eyes, hear it with my own ears and speak directly to as many patients and doctors in low-income neighbourhoods as I possibly can. I call this 3-dimensional market research (3DMR). Read more