MCIS

Myha Truong

The remaining days of my summer internship are dwindling rapidly. And the act of wrapping up my projects and preparing a presentation to the Multilingual Community Interpreter Services’ management and board of directors to debrief them about my experience and projects, has forced me to reflect on the events of the past three months. 

Myha Truong

My biggest concern for the performance evaluation and measurement framework is its successful implementation. While I can develop a detailed and top-notch implementation plan, it will not succeed if all the necessary ingredients are not in place and the organisation’s actions do not reflect the recommendations contained in the plan. 

Myha Truong

One of the social impact targets that MCIS has is to facilitate the entry of newcomers into the labour force by providing interpreter training.  Training is provided at no cost and financial support for the program is funded through profits generated from MCIS’ interpretation and translation activities.

Myha Truong

I am happy to report that my proposed performance evaluation and measurement framework was well received and approved by the board of directors.

The next step in this project is to develop operational strategies and tactics to get the framework running. Part of this work entails reviewing existing business practices to determine whether or not they will support the framework. 

Myha Truong

With a month left of my internship, the push is on for me to finish developing the performance evaluation and measurement framework that I was hired to develop.

Several interesting challenges have been encountered in the development of this framework.

The most interesting and frustrating challenge has been helping some members of management understand the issue and importance of alignment. Specifically, the performance measures chosen should be aligned with the organisation’s goals and it is these goals that drive the development of the performance measures and not the other way around. 

Myha Truong

This is our "intake" centre and the hub of our operations. The centre is where all interpreter requests are taken, co-ordinated and dispatched.  The centre operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and reflects the Multilingual Community Interpreter Services' commitment to serve the needs of those with limited English and non-English speaking people in accessing social services, especially individuals experiencing domestic violence and sexual assault.

The centre is where all interpreter requests are taken, coordinated and dispatched. The centre operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and reflects the Multilingual Community Interpreter Services' commitment to serve the needs of limited and non-English speaking persons in accessing social services, especially individuals experiencing domestic violence and sexual assault.

To date, my professional career has been a series of occupations that would invariably draw blank stares and a litany of questions when I tell (highly educated) people what I do for a living.

When I worked as an urban planner, I was often asked if I planted trees for a living. Things did not improve when I became a policy advisor in the areas of municipal management and housing. I was repeatedly asked if being a policy advisor meant that I was a secretary.

You can imagine the fun I am having this time around when I tell people I am interning as a strategy consultant for a non-profit social enterprise. What puzzles people the most is not my job title, but rather the term non-profit social enterprise. While most people understand what a non-profit organisation is they are less knowledgable about social enterprises. I will be honest and admit that, a few months ago, I too was one of these individuals.