Social enterprise

James Doherty, Esade Business School

After nine months of preparation tonight is the big night for James Doherty and his team from Esade Business School. They are finalists in the Hult Prize – a start-up accelerator for social entrepreneurship. Will they win the $1m in seed capital for their venture? Read more

Diana Mak, Guanghua School of Management, Peking University

With graduation just around the corner, it is now time to plan the next move Read more

Diana Mak, Guanghua School of Management, Peking University

Graduation is almost upon her, and one blogger is going to continue her dream of founding a social enterprise Read more

Andi Caruso, SDA Bocconi

An internship gives students the chance to try out potential careers, often ones that before business school they would never have considered Read more

Anthemos Georgiades, Harvard Business School

With the school year coming to a close with graduation last week, I asked my friend and previous interview subject Freddy Flaxman to briefly share his reflections on Harvard Business School with an address to our fellow graduating Class of 2012. These were his thoughts. Read more

Mehul Ruparelia, Indian School of Business

To mark the 10th anniversary of the Indian School of Business, the president of India paid a visit to the campus Read more

Chloe Weisberg, Stern School of Business, NYU

During my first semester last year, I quickly found out that an MBA is more than just classes, homework, recruiting (and socialising!); it is also about taking on leadership roles in student-led clubs and actively contributing to the MBA community.

 Read more

Myha Truong

This is our "intake" centre and the hub of our operations. The centre is where all interpreter requests are taken, co-ordinated and dispatched.  The centre operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and reflects the Multilingual Community Interpreter Services' commitment to serve the needs of those with limited English and non-English speaking people in accessing social services, especially individuals experiencing domestic violence and sexual assault.

The centre is where all interpreter requests are taken, coordinated and dispatched. The centre operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and reflects the Multilingual Community Interpreter Services' commitment to serve the needs of limited and non-English speaking persons in accessing social services, especially individuals experiencing domestic violence and sexual assault.

To date, my professional career has been a series of occupations that would invariably draw blank stares and a litany of questions when I tell (highly educated) people what I do for a living.

When I worked as an urban planner, I was often asked if I planted trees for a living. Things did not improve when I became a policy advisor in the areas of municipal management and housing. I was repeatedly asked if being a policy advisor meant that I was a secretary.

You can imagine the fun I am having this time around when I tell people I am interning as a strategy consultant for a non-profit social enterprise. What puzzles people the most is not my job title, but rather the term non-profit social enterprise. While most people understand what a non-profit organisation is they are less knowledgable about social enterprises. I will be honest and admit that, a few months ago, I too was one of these individuals. Read more

Myha Truong

About a week into my job, I quickly realised that the prices we charge for our services invariably result in a heated debate about what the “right price” should be.  Nowhere was this more evident than in the meetings we held to discuss pricing strategies for the requests for proposals.

Within the organisation, there are two schools of thought on this issue.  The first argues that we should offer our services as cheaply as possible. MCIS after all is a non-profit organisation, therefore it should not be concerned with making money. Rather, its focus should be on ensuring that limited and non-English speaking persons can access social services through the use of interpreters.  Read more

Maria Karaivanova

Everyone goes to Harvard Business School eager to start their business careers. Not me, at least not yet. This summer I decided to volunteer in Africa before setting off to a full-time job.

Lapdesks in action

Lapdesks in action

I am writing from Johannesburg, South Africa where I’m working at a company called Lapdesk.

I first heard of Lapdesk on my first day of class at Harvard when I was handed a case study about the company. And I was confused. I was at Harvard Business School. I expected to learn about a Fortune 500 company or a famous CEO. Why were we focused on a South African company whose goal was to eradicate classroom desk shortages throughout Africa by manufacturing ergonomically designed Lapdesks made out of high quality recyclable plastic?

What is ergonomically? Good question – they’re shaped like kidney beans and have a comfortable handle.

After an inspiring discussion, combined with a 20 minute video conference with the founder, Shane Immelman, I realised why. There are 80 million children throughout Africa without a desk. That is a huge business opportunity. Lapdesk is addressing this social problem, with a dynamic private sector proposition. Read more