Monthly Archives: October 2009

Economics headlines from around the web Read more

The IMF has issued a warning about asset price bubbles forming in Latin America, echoing concerns about bubbles in East Asia. As regulators and legislators in the US and UK argue over the best way to prevent another Lehman’s, the US government enters into a new $5.6bn bail-out Read more

Economics headlines from around the web Read more

China, India and Australia should all consider tightening monetary policy, says the IMF. Emerging economies show healthy signs, as US legislators fight to keep the house market moving, against falling prices, credit warnings and reduced mortgage applications Read more

Ralph Atkins

UK labour markets are behaving more like the eurozone average than the US, writes Ralph Atkins in a blog for the Financial Times  Read more

Economics headlines from around the web Read more

Some consensus among the American media that extending the US housing tax credit is a bad idea. And a conflict between those who think banks should be made smaller, and legislators, who are currently pursuing a strategy of better monitoring and increased powers over big banks Read more

Krishna Guha

Is ultra-loose monetary policy fuelling new asset price bubbles? The Fed view is that there is little evidence of this in the US. But it is keeping an eye out all the same.

US house prices may have bottomed but they have not bounced. The equity risk premium on stocks remains high by historic standards. Commodity price strength can be explained by vigour in emerging economies. Read more

Economics headlines from around the web Read more

Have we just seen the turning point in equity markets? A slew of bearish data from the US includes renewed predictions of falling property prices, and the UK should ensure credit is available to non-financial institutions too, if it wants to avoid the fate of mid 1990s Japan Read more

Mure Dickie

The Bank of Japan is laying the ground for an end to emergency measures. But such moves are politically fraught, and the central bank is trying to reassure the public that it has no plans to raise interest rates Read more

Ralph Atkins

What will the ECB make of the new German government, asks Ralph Atkins in a Financial Times blog Read more

Ralph Atkins

Estimates of Ireland’s dependence on ECB liquidity injections have been published by Royal Bank of Scotland, writes Ralph Atkins in a Financial Times blog Read more

Economics news headlines from the FT’s Money Supply blog Read more

Decoupling? Asian economies discuss increasing intra-regional trade that is less dependent on exports to the West. Conflicting indicators from the US and warnings of bubbles in the UK Read more

Ralph Atkins

An attack by Christian Noyer on the banking system reflects the ECB’s mood, writes Ralph Atkins of the Financial Times Read more

Money Supply, a Financial Times blog, rounds up the news for Friday, October 23 Read more

UK economy shrinks in third quarter – FT
Fed pay rules to rein in risk-taking – FT
Fed weighs language on rates guidance – FT
Bank deputy Tucker contradicts King – FT
Wolf: Why curbing finance is hard to do – FT
Lombard: Define the bank problem and get on with solving it – FT
Insight: Rally fuelled by cheap money brings a sense of foreboding – FT
US jobless claims climb more than projected – FT
OECD urges swift action on spending – FT
China growth underlines rapid rebound – FT
Questions remain over China’s consumer power – FT
Krugman: The Chinese disconnect – New York Times
New evidence on the rise of trade and social protection – VoxEU
Free Exchange: Chinese growth looks strong – Economist

Chris Giles

By any account, the UK’s third quarter contraction of 0.4 per cent is bad, writes Chris Giles of the Financial Times  Read more

Krishna Guha

Krishna Guha of the Financial Times discusses the Fed’s extended period language Read more