Daily Archives: March 25, 2011

I said previously that any eurozone bail-out should ideally happen after 2013. Events have overtaken me. It would be best, now, if vulnerable euro member states could hang on for a couple more years. And all because of domestic German politics.

Angela Merkel’s coalition partners, the Free Democrats, resisted the idea of paying in so much capital to the eurozone rescue fund so quickly. As a result, the eurozone rescue fund will be capitalised later, and more slowly.

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Chris Giles

I am currently engaged in an entertaining tussle with the Office for Budget Responsibility, the newish and independent fiscal watchdog. I am sure our disagreement will be resolved quickly. I have no reason to doubt the independence of the OBR staff, nor their stated desire for transparency. But at the moment they are being surprisingly secretive over the most important judgment in their forecast.

The OBR’s remit is to determine whether the government has a greater than evens chance of meeting its binding fiscal goal to balance the structural current budget deficit by 2015-16. Regular readers of this blog will know that I am boringly consistent in thinking this goal is useless because it relies upon splitting the forecast for borrowing into structural and cyclical components, a task which is so difficult as to make it not worth bothering.

But we live in a world where a public body – the OBR – has been given this difficult task and so its judgments need to be scrutinised. Your taxes and the level of public spending literally depends on the OBR’s assessment. Read more

Eurozone

Other news

The ESM term sheet claims its first casualty. As predicted, Standard and Poors rating agency has downgraded Portugal by two notches to BBB, leaving the rating on creditwatch negative, meaning another downgrade is likely within three months if there is no improvement in the country’s financial prospects. A further downgrade could place Portugal’s rating below investment grade: S&P’s rating is now just two notches above junk. But by then, the country will have passed or failed two significant tests: refinancing its debt in the markets in April and June.

S&P’s move is likely to be more significant than recent downgrades by Moody’s and Fitch. That’s because, first, S&P is leading the rating descent, having downgraded Portugal to its current Moody’s/Fitch level of A- in May of last year. (Moody’s and Fitch have only just downgraded to this level.) Second, the downgrade is significant because of timing. With a key vote on Portugal’s austerity package yet to pass and the PM stepping down, fiscal discipline will be further delayed. (This is one reason given by S&P for the move.) More than that, general elections are expected in a few months, and it would be very tempting for a new government to restructure its debt, laying the blame with its predecessors. Similar temptations must be present in Ireland.