Monthly Archives: May 2014

Robin Harding

Andrew Levin, a Fed staffer who worked extensively on Janet Yellen’s communication reforms when she was vice-chair, sets out a set of principles for central bank communications in a paper at today’s Hoover central banking conference.

He calls for press conferences after every Fed meeting and a quarterly, Bank of England-style monetary policy report. Mr Levin is currently at the IMF but this a direction many Fed officials want to go.

Here are Mr Levin’s principles, with my highlights in bold, and comments in italic: Read more

Chris Giles

Professor Thomas Piketty has given a more detailed response to the Financial Times articles and blogs on his wealth inequality data in Capital in the 21st Century (here, here, here and here). He says it is “simply wrong” to suggest he made errors in his data.

There are a few things on which we agree. First, the source data on wealth inequality is poor. I have written that it is “sketchy” and Prof Piketty says it is “much less systematic than we have for income inequality”. Second, it would have been preferable for Prof Piketty to have used a more sophisticated averaging technique than a simple average of Britain, France and Sweden to derive an estimate for European wealth inequality. Third, the available data suggests a broad trend of reduction in wealth inequality during most of the 20th Century. Read more

Emily Cadman

French academic Thomas Piketty has issued a detailed response to criticism by the Financial Times of his work on inequality, saying it is “simply wrong” to suggest he made errors in his data.

The best-selling author of Capital in the Twenty-First Century, which has ignited an international debate on trends in inequality, said “the corrections proposed by the FT to my series (and with which I disagree) are for the most part relatively minor, and do not affect the long run evolutions and my overall analysis”. Read more

How do you measure what prostitutes and drug dealers do for the economy? Britain’s official statisticians have had a go – and decided their inclusion in the UK’s GDP estimates will add about £10bn to the size of the economy in 2009. But how did they get to that number? Read more

 

Drug-dealers and their customers in the UK may be breaking the law, but at least they are making us richer. Illegal activities such as prostitution and drug dealing will add £10bn to the UK economy, the Office of National Statistics said today, as part of an overhaul of how we calculate national gross domestic productRead more

Chris Giles

Ever since the Financial Times wrote articles pointing to data problems in Professor Thomas Piketty’s best-selling book, there has been quite a heated reaction online and in print. In this post, I will give what I hope are some more relevant details, address a few misunderstandings and reply to some of the very legitimate questions that have been raised over the past few days.

For those that do not like lists, I apologise because this is something of a long list. Read more

Claire Jones

During the ECB’s forum on central banking which is taking place in the Portuguese town of Sintra, president Mario Draghi took the opportunity to discuss his views on how to breath new life into the eurozone’s market for securitisation. Read more

(c) Getty Images

A sobering message from Larry Summers this afternoon in a speech at the “Conference on Inclusive Capitalism” in LondonRead more

Claire Jones

The European Central Bank is not exactly renowned for stoking inflation. At 0.7 per cent, price pressures are now less than half its target of below but close to 2 per cent — something that the governing council has done nothing to correct over the past six months.

That did not stop Paul Krugman today telling the ECB to raise its target even higher. The Princeton professor was standing only meters away from Mario Draghi, in Sintra at an event that the eurozone’s monetary authority hopes to become its own version of the US Federal Reserve’s Jackson Hole.

As hard sells go, this is right up there. Read more

Chris Giles

Professor Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century has data on wealth inequality at its core. His data collection has been universally praised. Prof Piketty says he has collected,

“as complete and consistent a set of historical sources as possible in order to study the dynamics of income and wealth distribution over the long run”

However, when writing an article on the distribution of wealth in the UK, I noticed a serious discrepancy between the contemporary concentration of wealth described in Capital in the 21st Century and that reported in the official UK statistics. Professor Piketty cited a figure showing the top 10 per cent of British people held 71 per cent of total national wealth. The Office for National Statistics latest Wealth and Assets Survey put the figure at only 44 per centRead more