Sarah O'Connor

Sarah O’Connor is the FT’s economics correspondent in London. Before that, she was a Lex writer, covered the US economy from Washington and the Icelandic banking collapse from Reykjavik. Sarah studied Social and Political Sciences at Cambridge University and joined the FT in 2007.

How do you measure what prostitutes and drug dealers do for the economy? Britain’s official statisticians have had a go – and decided their inclusion in the UK’s GDP estimates will add about £10bn to the size of the economy in 2009. But how did they get to that number? Read more >>

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A sobering message from Larry Summers this afternoon in a speech at the “Conference on Inclusive Capitalism” in LondonRead more >>

The UK’s labour market figures have sparked a lot of excitement – and a certain amount of confusion – on the hot topic of real wage growth. Here are six charts that explain what has happened and what it means.

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The UK has spent years fretting about its dismal productivity performance in the wake of the financial crisis, but it’s no closer to figuring out what has gone wrong or what (if anything) should be done about it.

Perhaps it should look further afield. The UK is not the only place with a “productivity puzzle” on its hands: New Zealand is scratching its head too. For a developed country with seemingly supportive policies on tax, regulation and education, New Zealand’s workers are surprisingly unproductive, and they don’t seem to be improving very quickly either. Read more >>

 

Britain’s finance minister George Osborne is off to Washington this week to give an “I told you so” speech about the merits of his austerity programme.

But if a paper to be presented today is to be believed, the credit for lowering Britain’s budget deficit should really go to his Old Etonian boss David CameronRead more >>