Bank of Mexico

Claire Jones

Davos is not as important an event on the calendars of central bankers as the IMF/World Bank meetings or the Bank for International Settlements Annual General Meeting. Neither the Bank of England nor the Federal Reserve will be bothering to send anyone, for instance.

But there are still plenty of Davos men (and one woman) among the senior ranks of the profession. 

Claire Jones

Our week ahead email helps you track the most important events in central banking. To see all of our emails and alerts visit www.ft.com/nbe

BofE

The Bank of England’s financial (in?)stability report is due out on Thursday. 

Claire Jones

Our week ahead email will help you to track the most important events in the central banking world. To see all of our emails and alerts visit www.ft.com/nbe

The Federal Open Market Committee’s minutes are out on Wednesday for its late September meeting, where the majority backed Operation Twist, at 14.00 DC time (18:00 GMT). 

Simone Baribeau

I called the end too soon. The Argentine central bank fiasco has clearly outlived Martín Redrado stepping aside. In an unexpected twist, a presidential ally was chosen to head the country’s central bank.

From tomorrow’s paper… 

Simone Baribeau

The Senate has confirmed Agustín Carstens, Mexico’s finance minister, as its next central banker, less than a week after Mexican President Felipe Calderón nominated him to the post.

Mr Carstens will take the post on January 1. His confirmation comes the day after Standard and Poor’s downgraded Mexico’s government debt to BBB, highlighting concerns on the country’s diminishing oil production prospects and expectations for weak overall growth. 

Adam Thomson of the Financial Times writes about the political implications of Mexico’s newly nominated central bank governor