Emerging markets

By Robin Wigglesworth

A slew of economic news and data has come out over the past 24 hours, some good, some bad, and some outright ugly. But if one thing is clear, the economic recovery of advanced economies is far from assured. Here are five highlights, and things to keep in mind.

1: Markets believe the Fed will keep stimulating the economy

Janet Yellen, the nominee for the Federal Reserve chairmanship, will highlight now the US economy is performing “far short” of its potential at her Senate testimony on Thursday, according to prepared remarks released on Wednesday evening. Deutsche Bank’s Jim Reid points out that while the “tones are certainly dovish, it’s impossible to infer precise policy thoughts from her remarks”. That hasn’t stopped financial markets from rallying on the hope that the presumptive new Fed chairwoman will keep pumping money into the global economy for longer than previously expected. Read more

By Eswar Prasad, Karim Foda, and Arnav Sahu

The latest update of the Brookings-FT Tiger index shows that the global economic recovery is back on track, although it remains slow and unsteady. The recovery is being borne along by surging business and consumer confidence in advanced economies, and stabilisation in the growth of emerging markets. However, it may be premature for policymakers to declare victory as the recovery is still tenuous and just a shock or two away from turning into another slump.

Advanced economies seem to have put the worst behind them. The US economy continues to push forward at a modest pace and the UK is experiencing surprisingly good growth, while the core eurozone economies and Japan are also turning in positive growth. Across the board, private sector confidence has improved in these economies and inflation remains subdued. However, labour market performance continues to be weak and financial conditions are still mixed. The postponement of the US Federal Reserve’s tapering of its quantitative easing policies sparked a rally in equity markets but credit growth has not picked up in most advanced economies, still acting as a drag on the recovery. Read more