Eurozone

Claire Jones

The European Central Bank has found itself caught in the crossfire of a battle raging between the world’s leading macroeconomists.

The Bank for International Settlements’ call last month for the world’s central bankers to hurry up and raise interest rates has reignited the debate over how to explain – and tackle – the financial and economic turmoil that has persisted over the past six years. Read more

Ferdinando Giugliano

The importance of small and medium-sized enterprises as engines of job creation is a well-established economic fact. In countries such as Italy and Spain, SMEs account for 70-80 per cent of the workforce, and for a similar proportion of all newly created jobs.

Much less is known, however, about which kinds of SMEs are better at boosting employment. The SMEs universe is varied, but distinguishing between them is essential for governments to direct their economic policies in an effective way.

A study published this week by the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development analyses in painstaking detail a database including SMEs from 18 countries over ten years. Its main finding is that among all SMEs, it is the youngest companies that contribute the most to boosting employment. Read more

By Hugh Carnegy in Paris

Update: Since we published this post, Chris Williamson, chief economist at Markit, has been in touch to say there is no significant divergence with Insee. There has been a lot of comment on this among economists in recent months so his take is important. Thanks to him for the contribution added at the bottom of the post.

Trying to work out exactly what is going on in France’s economy? Recently there has been a marked divergence between indicators from Markit and those from Insee, France’s statistics institute, with the former a good deal more gloomy than the latter.

This continues to be the case – but at least this month there is a bit of convergence, with Insee indicators level-pegging compared with December, while Markit’s figures show a three-month high.

 

 

 

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