Riksbank

Claire Jones

Our week ahead email helps you to track the most important events in central banking. To see all of our emails and alerts visit www.ft.com/nbe

ECB cut likely
Next week’s two key events are the Bank of England’s and the European Central Bank’s monetary policy votes. Expect both central banks to act. Read more

Claire Jones

Quantitative easing is here to stay. At least if three economists at the Riksbank have anything to do it.

The Riksbank economists argue in a fascinating paper published at the end of last week that — far from being the sort of policy measure undertaken only in extreme circumstances — buying bonds should become commonplace for central banks.

Given what we’ve seen in the past few years, the Riksbank’s research makes some sense. Read more

Claire Jones

Our week ahead email helps you to track the most important events in central banking. To see all of our emails and alerts visit www.ft.com/nbe

BoE minutes

The minutes of the Monetary Policy Committee’s April meeting are out on Wednesday at 9.30am (8.30am GMT). Read more

Claire Jones

Our week ahead email helps you track the most important events in central banking. To see all of our emails and alerts visit www.ft.com/nbe

Inflation Report

The Bank of England’s Inflation Report is out on Wednesday, and with it the Monetary Policy Committee’s eagerly awaited forecast for inflation. Read more

Claire Jones

Money Supply will be running a series of Q&As on some of the more arcane but newsworthy aspects of central banking. Any suggestions for Q&As from our readers are of course welcome.

So the Federal Reserve on Wednesday will publish forecasts which will show us how long it plans to keep rates at more-or-less zero. Hasn’t it done that already?

Sort of. The voting members of the Federal Open Market Committee, which is responsible for setting interest rates, have already committed to keep rates at their current record lows until at least the middle of next year.

The move to produce interest rate forecasts however is a slightly different, slightly bolder step. Read more

Claire Jones

Lars Nyberg, deputy governor of Sweden’s Riksbank up until the turn of the year, has decried an IMF-led eurozone bail-out as absurd and lambasted the call for private sector involvement in the Greek debt crisis as having done irreparable harm.

The European Central Bank wouldn’t object – it too hasn’t liked either idea. But Frankfurt will be less pleased at Mr Nyberg’s calls to step into the breach. Read more

Claire Jones

Because monetary policy acts with a lag, it has to rely on forecasts.

However, as the Bank of England’s attempts at prediction have illustrated, central banks’ forecasts, and indeed those of most economists, tend to be pretty dire.

This is what Svante Öberg, first deputy governor of Sweden’s Riksbank, refers to in a speech out today as the “Catch-22 of monetary policy.” So what’s a central banker to do?  Read more

Claire Jones

Our week ahead email helps you track the most important events in central banking. To see all of our emails and alerts visit www.ft.com/nbe  Read more

Claire Jones

Our week ahead email will help you to track the most important events in the central banking world. To see all of our emails and alerts visit www.ft.com/nbe

The Federal Open Market Committee’s minutes are out on Wednesday for its late September meeting, where the majority backed Operation Twist, at 14.00 DC time (18:00 GMT). Read more

Claire Jones

Our week ahead email will help you to track the most important events in the central banking world. To see all of our emails and alerts visit www.ft.com/nbe

The majority of the world’s central bank governors and finance ministers are in Washington, DC this weekend for the IMF/ World Bank Annual Meetings.

Will there be any more policy coordination following the G-20 communiqué released late Thursday? Read more