Emergency Budget

France is aiming for a bank levy of €300m but ” would really like” €1bn, French finance minister Christine Lagarde has announced. Yikes. George Osborne’s feat — taxing the banks £2bn while reassuring them of a level playing field — seems a little less impressive. Might this put Mr Osborne off considering further bank levies?

Lucky for UK banks, then, that the UK levy is so small. And largely offset by corporation tax gains.

Chris Giles

The abuse of the word “progressive” continues. In his Budget speech yesterday, George Osborne said:

“Overall, everyone will pay something, but the people at the bottom of the income scale will pay proportionally less than the people at the top. It is a progressive Budget.” 

Chris Giles

The 2010 emergency Budget has lived up to its historic billing. Huge spending cuts and big tax rises are planned to bring borrowing down from its current rate in excess of 10 per cent of national income.

No allowance has been given to those who worry that such rapid deficit reduction might hit the economy too hard and make it counter-productive. We are back to Lord Snowden’s in 1931, described as an “evangelical Pennine socialist” by Lord Jenkins. I don’t think that description applies to George Osborne; and he must hope his reputation survives better than his 1930s predecessor. Here are four things that have interested me so far.

  • The big news. Obviously, real spending cuts of 25 per cent in government departments outside health and overseas aid are big. Very big. This will mean the pain from this Budget will be felt for years and not just tonight. The really interesting thing is that

 

Live blog on UK Budget now running at Westminster blog.

All coverage available via Budget in-depth.

Chris Giles

This morning the Financial Times is running quite a few Budget stories. My favorites are the pieces about the regional effect of spending cuts, which we have simulated (click on the beautiful maps). These show very simply that whether public spending is cut from social security or from government consumption, it will hit growth harder in the North than South and harder in poorer than in richer areas.

George Osborne’s constituency of Tatton in Cheshire suffers the least of any region on one of the comparisons. The chancellor will like that. Others might take a different view.

Some may say that is a description of the bleeding obvious since everyone know that public spending tends to follow need. Of course it is also not a dynamic model, just some very simple calculations, but they are important in showing the first-round effect of cuts. I have not seen anyone else doing this sort of thing. It might even make Nick Clegg, deputy prime minster, stop and pause before describing spending cuts as fair and progressive. The cuts might well be necessary,