mortgage asset sales

James Politi

Kevin Warsh, a governor at the Federal Reserve, has just delivered a very interesting speech in Atlanta.

His main point is that the Fed could start selling mortgage assets it bought to sustain the housing market during the crisis independently of its moves to raise interest rates, putting him squarely in the camp of inflation hawks on the Federal open market committee. Ben Bernanke, Fed chairman, has suggested that any asset sales should come only after monetary policy tightening underway, but Mr Warsh seems to disagree. “Any sale of assets need not signal that policy rates are soon moving higher. Our policy tools can indeed be used independently. I would note that the Fed successfully communicated and demonstrated its ability to exit from most of its extraordinary liquidity facilities over late 2009 and early 2010, even as it continued its policy of extraordinary accommodation,” he said.

The Fed governor, a former Morgan Stanley investment banker and George W. Bush administration official, also attempted to quash the rising talk that the Fed might actually start buying assets again in response to continued weakness in the housing sector and the sluggish recovery, saying that such a move “should be subject to strict scrutiny”. Read more

James Politi

Even though many economists have pushed back their expectations of the first interest rate hike by the Federal Reserve, the debate rages on about the tools the central bank should eventually use to tighten monetary policy.

In a research paper out today, Glenn Rudebusch, senior vice-president at the San Francisco Fed, makes a compelling case for not rushing to shrink the Fed’s $2,300bn-plus balance sheet, a move that some more hawkish officials have been pushing for early in the tightening cycle in order to contain inflation.

Overall, Mr Rudebusch concludes that since many predict the US economy will take “years” to return to full employment and inflation will stay low, it will take “a significant amount of time” for the Fed to exit from its current easy money monetary policy stance.

But some of his most interesting points Read more

James Politi

The 30-year fixed rate mortgage rate in the US fell this week to a five month low of 4.93 per cent, according to Freddie Mac.

Mortgage rates had spiked above 5.20 per cent early last month, just after the Federal Reserve ended its $1.250bn plan hatched during the financial crisis to purchase mortgage-backed securities and support the housing market. Read more

James Politi

Most of our interview on Saturday with James Bullard, president of the St Louis Federal Reserve Bank, was focused on his stance on the financial reform bill, which he seems quite exercised about.

But left on the cutting room floor were some of his observations on last week’s meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee, which he attended. Read more