Paul Tucker

Claire Jones

Our week ahead email helps you to track the most important events in central banking. To see all of our emails and alerts visit www.ft.com/nbe

Bernanke testimony

Fed chairman Ben Bernanke faces Congress next week for the central bank’s twice-yearly Monetary Policy Report to the Senate and the House of Representatives.

Will Mr Bernanke offer any clues that the launch of QE3 is imminent? This from the FT’s US economics editor Robin Harding: Read more

Chris Giles

Mervyn King, Governor of the Bank of England

Mervyn King, Governor of the Bank of England

There is still more than 14 months to go before Sir Mervyn King leaves the Bank of England, but he is already in danger of appearing a lame duck as the race to succeed begins in earnest.

Today the FT reported that Mark Carney, the governor of the Bank of Canada, has been approached in relation to the job by a member of the Bank’s court, its governing body, having spoken to three people involved in the process. Mr Carney declined to comment. The Bank of Canada said the report was not accurate.

The FT also reported that the Treasury wants Charlie Bean, deputy governor for monetary policy, to remain in post after his term expires in June 2013 to provide some continuity as the top echelons of the Bank are rearranged. No one has denied this part of the story and Mr Bean has told colleagues he is willing to accept any offer to stay on for an interim period. So where do these events put the runners, the riders and those subtly touting themselves for the job. Read more

Chris Giles

For almost the entire time the Bank of England has enjoyed operational control of monetary policy, the redistributive effects of monetary policy have rarely hit the headlines.

The public appeared to accept that interest rate rises hit borrowers and benefited savers and vice versa. The vast majority of the commentary related to the analysis of whether any monetary policy change was warranted by the prospects for inflation. This, in Britain at least, was the way the Bank of England liked it.

Unelected officials feel very uncomfortable about being seen to favour one group of society over another. Redistribution, after all, is properly something for elected politicians, since it involves using the power of the state to take money from some to give it to others.

It is noteworthy, therefore, both that the distributional effects of quantitative easing are now being raised vocally by strong lobby groups and that the Bank is feeling peeved, rightly so.  Read more

Claire Jones

Our week ahead email helps you track the most important events in central banking. To see all of our emails and alerts visit www.ft.com/nbe

Bernanke testimony

Fed chairman Ben Bernanke is due to speak on the economic outlook and federal budget situation on Thursday. He’s up in front of the House Committee on the Budget at 10.00 local time (15.00 GMT) on Thursday. Read more

Claire Jones

When the Bank of England’s latest fan charts showed inflation falling way below the 2 per cent target, analysts were quick to conclude that the MPC, or at least De La Rue, “was already greasing the wheels of the money printing presses” in expectation of more QE.

The Bank’s central forecast shows inflation falling to 1.3 per cent by the end of 2013, which would suggest that further asset purchases are indeed on the way.

But, if the views of Paul Tucker, deputy governor for financial stability, chime with those of his fellow MPC members, then more QE may not necessarily be a dead cert. Or at least that the scale of the additional easing may be far smaller than analysts expect. Read more

Claire Jones

Sir Mervyn King is not known for his fondness for international travel, preferring to send one of his two deputies – Charlie Bean and Paul Tucker – whenever possible.

The governor, however, has traditionally made an exception for the IMF/ World Bank autumn meetings. Read more