re-capitalisation

Turkey’s central bank stepped in again this week to clear confusion over the effects of its unorthodox monetary policy, after the release of data that appeared to contradict comments made by officials. The trouble was caused by balance of payments data: it showed portfolio inflows of $2.3bn in January, higher than a year earlier and at odds with official claims that some $10bn of “hot money” had left the country since December, when the central bank began “quantitative tightening” to deal with macroeconomic imbalances.

Two clarifications from the central bank have cleared up the discrepancy. The balance of payments data showed foreign investors had sold out of Turkish equities since November, while increasing their exposure to debt instruments. But the figures did not include money market transactions, mainly in the form of swap operations. Here, the central bank said, there had indeed been an outflow of $11.5bn since November. Read more

The ratings agencies have been busy: we are awash with downgrades and warnings. First up, S&P. They have ranked banks’ health using a new methodology, and it makes for grim reading. Just nine of 45 banks exceeded the minimum “risk-adjusted capital” ratio (for example, HSBC did well; UBS and Citigroup less so). The results are important because the new methodology foreshadows the new capital regime ratio likely to be adopted by Basel next year. S&P conclusion: “Capital for the majority of banks remains a relative weakness.”

Next, Fitch has downgraded Mexico to BBB, just two notches above junk status. Read more

Good news if you’re feeling flush: IPOs are on the rise and racehorses are on sale. India plans to launch energy-efficient trading scheme and financial innovation may again become popular Read more