sanctions

Robin Harding

Data from the Treasury International Capital system have always got a lot of stick. The system is meant to show foreign holdings of US assets broken down by country (and vice versa) but has a big problem with ‘custodial bias’: it struggles to track funds beyond the financial centre where they are held, e.g. the UK, Switzerland, the Channel Islands, various dodgy Caribbean destinations etc.

Recent sanctions on Libya have created a fascinating natural experiment on just how big that ‘custodial bias’ actually is. Does the amount of Libyan assets in the US reported to TIC match up with the amount of Libyan assets frozen in the US? Answer: a resounding ‘No’. Read more

In the early days of the telephone, human operators played a crucial role: you called the operator, asked for the Joneses at a certain address, and she called them for you and connected you. Telephones were never forecast to be ubiquitous: their number would be forever constrained by the cost and availability of human operators required to make the system work.

Few people – if any – envisaged automatic connection. When it finally came along, no doubt it was unpopular with telephone operators. But the sacrifice of their jobs – painful as it was – paved the way for the highly efficient system we know today. It is unlikely the telephone operators were consulted on the matter, much less given the deciding vote.

So there is a level on which it seems strange that EU policymakers should get to choose whether or not they remain a part of the fiscal sanctions process. Euro member states might be punished if they are fiscally irresponsible, going forwards, but then again they might not: it will depend upon votes by policymakers. The ECB’s proposal for semi-automatic sanctions has been thwarted: the decision to punish will remain lengthy – and political.

There is a problem with this. Read more

Growing divergence between countries’ economic policies is threatening the global recovery, Mario Draghi has said.”The economic recovery is strong in the emerging countries, weak in the United States and uneven in the euro area. The economic policy responses are divergent,” said the Italian central bank governor. As some countries intervene in currency markets and imbalances grow, floating exchange rates are “feeling the gap,” he added, concluding: “The world recovery itself is at risk.”

Mr Draghi, who is a contender to succeed Jean-Claude Trichet as ECB President next year, said the only option is for countries to co-ordinate their economic policies more closely. That co-ordination could include limiting current account imbalances, avoiding protectionist policies, encouraging flexible exchange rates and reducing the volatility of capital inflows to emerging markets. He also indirectly supported calls for semi-automatic sanctions in the eurozone. Read more

China is one of 32 central banks in a group that released a statement last week, saying there would be further restrictions on Iranian banks if no action is taken on nuclear proliferation and terrorist financing.

The Financial Action Task Force had been asked to identify ‘unco-operative’ jurisdictions by the G20. On Tuesday, the US Treasury reiterated its interest in sanctions against Iran’s central bank. Read more