Monthly Archives: January 2013

Ukraine deal confirms Shell's commitment to shale gas. Getty Images.

Shell’s decision to invest $10bn in the development of shale gas in Ukraine is certainly a significant move.

First, it confirms Shell’s commitment to shale and the company’s determination to override environmental objections to the technology of fracking. Shell believes shale can be developed safely and cleanly enough to avoid damaging either the environment or the company’s reputation. This move will help to confirm shale’s arrival in the mainstream of the energy market. Read more

Western oil workers at In Amenas, the gas plant in Algeria that militants stormed on January 16, knew how vulnerable they were.

An executive from Statoil, the Norwegian oil company, told a visitor to the facility in 2007 that he worried about the risks to expatriate staff travelling to and from the site. After flying from Algiers into the middle of the Sahara, they faced an hour-long bus trip to In Amenas. “We want to build an airstrip near the plant and avoid bus transportation from the airport,” he said. Read more

When I first wrote about shale gas in the FT, back in 2011, one very senior oil industry executive told me that I was badly wrong and that shale would never have an impact beyond perhaps a couple of small areas in the US. A year later he did have the good grace to apologise.

Now shale gas is everywhere – from Ukraine, to China to South Africa (those are just the places where major investments were announced last week). There are still those who deny the importance of shale development, but like those who deny climate change they are beginning to look increasingly out of touch. Read more

Tel Aviv, Israel's financial centre. Getty Images

There is much talk in Davos of black swans, grey swans and white swans. But what about a kosher swan?

For the uninitiated, black swans are unexpected events that have a dramatic impact and sweep away previous certainties and plans.

Tel Aviv is a long way from Davos and not many Israeli politicians find their way up the Magic Mountain, but Shimon Peres, Israel’s president, is a very rare exception. Read more

Fires rage in Australia following record high temperatures. Getty Images

A few days after Typhoon Bopha tore through the Philippines in December, leaving hundreds dead and thousands homeless, a representative from the battered country began to speak at the UN climate talks in the Qatari capital of Doha.

Naderev Saño, the Philippine climate change commissioner, broke down as he made a plea to his fellow delegates, in what turned into one of the conference’s most riveting moments. Read more