Climate

Ed Miliband’s comments on energy in his Labour party conference speech on Tuesday have profound implications for policy. The immediate focus will be on the suggestion of a price freeze lasting until 2017. The industry will no doubt focus on the implications of cutting profits and the question of what happens if world prices rise. Some might also suggest that a hard freeze will not only deter new investment, but also lead to some companies exiting the business with the net effect of reducing competition. Mr Miliband clearly believes there is profiteering but he has not published the evidence. The Labour leader should and there needs to be a full competition inquiry. It may well be that if there is profiteering a price freeze is not the only nor the best solution. Read more

The moment is coming for a Presidential decision on the Keystone XL project – the extension of a existing pipeline system designed to take over 800,000 barrels a day of crude from the oil sands of Alberta to the refineries on the Gulf coast. A few months ago the betting was that reluctant approval would be given. Now, however, the pipeline looks more likely to be the victim of Washington politics. Read more

The German election later this month might seem to be about to produce more of the same. On the eurozone currency crisis – as Quentin Peel wrote in the Financial Times a couple of weeks ago – the expectation of a big reform plan once Angela Merkel wins re-election has given way to the realisation that nothing much will change unless the markets force a radical response. Austerity and crisis management are the watchwords, and only a major event such as a collapse in the credibility of Italian debt repayment will force Germany to address the need for a full-scale resolution of the problem. That could involve the creation of a tighter EU core, or a reluctant acceptance that the euro as designed cannot work without a backstop funding mechanism in the form of Eurobonds. Nothing in the election campaign has provided a clue as to which of these alternatives will prevail.

Similarly on energy policy the election is beginning to look like a breakpoint which could have wide implications across Europe. But the direction of change remains uncertain and dangerously dependent on the precise make up of the next coalition government. Read more

At the last meeting of the President’s Committee of the CBI, the British employers’ association, members were asked to name the two biggest problems their companies faced. The answers were the skill levels of their recruits and energy policy – the chronic indecision of Whitehall which leaves investment frozen, prices rising uncompetitively and Ofgem warning about blackouts.

A few weeks ago at an Anglo Indian business summit one British bank Chairman warned the Indians that while an Indian energy strategy was clearly needed, the worst example they could follow was the UK model. Meanwhile on the serious side of Whitehall, there is increasing talk of a pre summer reshuffle to strengthen the Energy Department and even mutterings about abolishing the separate Ministry entirely and merging its functions back into the the business department. Read more

Those despairing of the lack of progress in managing climate change or the absence of practical and realistic energy policies in so many countries should take a look at the work being done by some of the world’s great universities.

In Durham, the Energy Institute has focused on the societal aspects of changes in energy technology. One of their main projects is to look at the role and potential of smart grids. Thanks to advances in IT, smart grids now offer the prospect of managing the distributed production and use of power in ways which will transform the economics of the whole sector. Smart grids create automatic processes which can help both businesses and households not only manage what they use but also to become producers themselves –selling power into the grid. Read more