Environment

Fires rage in Australia following record high temperatures. Getty Images

A few days after Typhoon Bopha tore through the Philippines in December, leaving hundreds dead and thousands homeless, a representative from the battered country began to speak at the UN climate talks in the Qatari capital of Doha.

Naderev Saño, the Philippine climate change commissioner, broke down as he made a plea to his fellow delegates, in what turned into one of the conference’s most riveting moments. 

The growth of wind farms and other renewable energy projects is heading for a sharp slowdown after 2020 according to official forecasts, despite ministers’ claims they want the UK to become a global centre of green power.

Figures from the Department of Energy and Climate Change predict a tenfold increase in the amount of new renewable power capacity added between 2012 and 2020.

 

Drilling barge the Kulluck Getty Images

Shell's drilling barge the Kulluk. Getty Images

There are two important lessons from the mounting problems facing Shell as a result of the series of accidents that have afflicted its drilling programme in the Arctic.

The first is that major companies must have the capacity to call a halt and to break the inexorable internal momentum that so often makes it impossible to stop projects once they have started. The ability to reconsider is a great sign of strength not weakness.

The second is that a company such as Shell which prides itself (rightly) on its environmental performance is only as good as its weakest contractor. 

Scroby Sands offshore wind farm in Norfolk, just two miles off Britain's east coast. Image by Getty

A good rule in politics is never to take on those who care about a particular issue more than you do. I was in Norfolk at the weekend and came face to face with the new force in UK politics – a regiment of middle-aged ladies burning with indignation and determined to use their considerable powers of organisation to protect what they hold dear.

The issue at stake is not Europe, which is the obsession at Westminster, or the recession, or gay marriage. The issue is the growth of wind farms and the march across the beautiful Norfolk coast of developers planting the farms in order to milk the generous subsidies on offer. Norfolk, of course, is not an isolated case. 

Mitt Romney has given Barack Obama a free pass when it comes to energy and environmental policy.  Obama needs only to point to Romney’s energy plan - with its proposed demolition of federal controls on new energy developments and its omission of any mention whatsoever of climate change to claim the votes of the environmental lobby.

Even those most disappointed by the last 4 years can hardly fail to back Obama when the alternative is someone who used his acceptance speech last week to mock Obama’s commitment to the environment and to contrast Obama’s aim of helping to save the earth and the oceans with his own commitment to helping ordinary American families get jobs.  But what won’t be said this week at the Democratic Convention in Charlotte is that the American energy outlook for the next four years at least is already very largely set, and won’t be much altered by whoever is elected in November.