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Saudi oil minister Ali al-Naimi holds a press conference in Doha after meeting energy ministers from Russia, Qatar and Venezuela  © Getty Images

The Saudis blinked. The latest deal — an agreement with Russia to freeze oil output at January levels if they are joined by other large producers — won’t rebalance the oil market immediately and the early surge in prices last week was rather premature. But they blinked and that is all important. The myth of Saudi power is broken.

The real steps necessary to rebalance the market have yet to come. Saudi production must come down. Others may join in the process but an overall cut of 3m barrels a day is now necessary and most of that will have to come from Saudi Arabia. Stocks must be run off. That will take time. Iran must be welcomed back into the market. That process will be slow and even estimates of another 400,000 barrels a day during 2016 now look high. But they will come back and have to be accommodated. The interests of other Opec member states — such as Venezuela and Algeria — must be taken into account. The Saudi’s lack of respect for their fellow producers over the last year has shaken many traditional alliances. The kingdom does not have that many allies. Read more

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Climate change demonstrators during the Paris conference  © Getty Images

Two papers published in the last few weeks provide a sobering reality check after the rhetorical success of the Paris climate change conference in December. Getting any agreement was a diplomatic triumph but producing real change on the scale necessary will be much more difficult. The two documents are very different but both excellent pieces of work. Their calculations and assumptions are detailed, transparent and, most important of all, evidence based. Both, however, reflect a degree of unjustified optimism. Read more

FRANCE-POLITICS-GOVERNMENT

Emmanuel Macron  © Getty Images

The most interesting comment at Davos this year came from the French economy minister Emmanuel Macron who said that he simply did not believe for a second the figures put out by the Chinese government claiming that their economy had grown by 6.9 per cent in 2015. To anyone familiar with Chinese statistics the comment is welcome because it brings into sharp focus the fact that no one can trust the data being produced by what is now one of the world’s largest economies. The doubts are not limited to macro economic numbers. Chinese data on the energy sector also deserve to be regarded with great scepticism.

There are three reasons why Chinese data might be inaccurate. The first is that it is simply extremely hard to gather reliable data across a country which is so vast. Good data is hard to come by. In Nigeria gross domestic product was revised upwards in 2013 by 89 per cent because the old basis of calculation was inaccurate. There are many issues even in much smaller and more developed countries. Read more

A supply that is plentiful demands some fresh ideas from the industry Read more

Hungarian engineer Miklos Sziva checks t

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Markets are inherently prone to volatility. Prices and valuations do not proceed in an orderly and linear fashion. Most important of all, they do not proceed in one direction for very long. The aim of any serious investment strategy should be to call the turning points and buy or sell accordingly. The energy market is at such a turning point and it will be fascinating to see who has the nerve and confidence to invest.

To say that this is a time to buy may sound odd following the criticism of Shell’s purchase of BG Group, which was reluctantly nodded through by fund managers last week. The issue is that the BG deal was based on prices roughly two and a half times above the current level and depends on an incredible forecast of future price trends. The result: a pyrrhic victory for Shell. That mistake, however, does not mean that other potential buyers of energy assets should be put off. At current prices, the time to buy is now. That applies to oil and gas but in different ways the same conclusion can be drawn for almost every part of the energy sector. Read more

The UK plan is uneconomic for owners and consumers, writes Nick Butler Read more

Oil pumps in operation at an oilfield ne

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We are about to enter the period when companies announce their annual results, declare dividends and reveal strategy updates. Across the energy sector from the major oil companies to the utilities to the smallest renewables businesses a huge amount of high-paid time is being devoted to the preparation of slide packs and press briefing notes. After a year of spectacular underperformance, many chief executives will rightly be nervous about the questions they could be asked.

Every individual company has its own particular problems but here are some generic questions that should be addressed to all those leading the main energy businesses across the world. Investors should be very wary of putting their money into any company whose leaders cannot provide straightforward and convincing answers. Read more

RUSSIA-INDIA-POLITICS-DIPLOMACY

President Vladimir Putin  © Getty Images

Of all those damaged by the oil price collapse, few are in a more difficult position than Russia. High prices have sustained the Russian economy since Vladimir Putin came to power in 1999. Hydrocarbons provide the overwhelming proportion of export revenue. Now something radical may be needed to avert economic collapse and political dissent.

Privatisation is back on the agenda of the international oil industry. Although the prospect of the Saudis selling a share in Aramco has been tantalisingly floated by the Saudi deputy crown prince Mohammed bin Salman in his interview with the Economist two weeks ago, there are other potential sales that are likely to be completed sooner. The most intriguing is the possibility that the Russian government will sell off another slice of its 69.5 per cent holding in Rosneft. Read more

IRAQ-OIL

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Oil is now $30 a barrel. For investors and those dependent on investment income the question is whether the pain being suffered by the oil and gas producers is about to spread to the wider economy. Over the next month most of the companies involved in the sector will produce their annual results and announce their dividends. Investors will be watching anxiously for cuts. But the stark and rather shocking truth is that most companies in the oil and gas business are being forced to borrow to meet their payout commitments and that is a dangerous thing to do.

After a fall in prices of 70 per cent over the last 18 months there is a strong prima facie case for dividends to be reduced. That would painful for investors — not least the institutions that are relying on big oil for more than 23 per cent of total market yield. (Another 8.9 per cent of yield should have come from the mining sector if Glencore and Anglo hadn’t already cut their dividends.) But will it actually happen? Read more

IRAQ-CONFLICT

The battle for Kirkuk, Iraq's oil capital  © Getty Images

It has always been hard to accept the argument that the series of wars in the Middle East since 2001 have been about oil. Afghanistan is not an oil state and most of the oil which will be produced from Iraq will end up in China and the Far East rather than in the US or Europe. On the other hand what is happening now in Syria and Northern Iraq shows that oil and power are inseparably linked. Read more

Ben van Beurden, Shell CEO  © Getty Images

Of course the answer is obvious. How could anyone be so foolish as to think that a company with earnings of $19bn in 2014, with reserves of 13bn barrels of oil and gas and with daily production of 3m barrels of oil and gas could possibly fail ? How could anyone think of bracketing Royal Dutch Shell with GEC, or ICI or Lehman Brothers — each in their time great companies but now reduced to dust. Perhaps it is impertinent to even ask the question. Surely Shell has survived for a century and more getting through wars, expropriation, an entanglement with Nazi Germany, the horrors of Nigeria and numerous other “crises”?

All true. Shell is undoubtedly one of the world’s great companies — decent, honest, civilised and a world leader in energy technology. But even those attributes do not provide complete protection in a world where the past is no guarantee of the future. Companies can have too much history and too great a sense of their own institutional importance. In a very competitive world no one is ever totally safe. Read more

There are two divergent views of what is happening to the oil price within the industry and among serious investors. 2016 may help us to see which is correct.

The first view is that the price is inherently cyclical. What has come down must go back up again and the deeper the trough the higher the next mountain.

The alternative analysis is that the shift we have seen over the past three years is the beginning of a long-term structural shift which will see energy prices materially lower in real terms in the next half century than in the last. Those who take this view believe, to put it very simply, that the likely growth in supply is stronger than the growth in demand.

 Read more

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A tunnel at the LNG terminal under construction at Dunkirk, France  © Getty Images

If you think the fall in the oil price is dramatic and disruptive, take a moment to consider the natural gas market. The world’s three main gas markets — in Europe, the US and Asia – may be distinct but the growth of trade in liquefied natural gas which can take it across the world has linked them. The impact of a swing in one market soon spreads across the globe.

According to the excellent analysis from Energy Aspects, prices for LNG in the key north-east Asian market – the supply into Japan and Korea – are down this year by more than 50 per cent to between $7 and 8 per million British thermal units (Btu), even allowing for a slight seasonal ramp up in the fourth quarter. That is almost 70 per cent down from the peak in 2013.

Unfortunately, at the time of that peak many companies got carried away and set in train dozens of new LNG projects worldwide. The complex technology of liquefaction means that each project is expensive – costing at least $5bn and often much more. Of the projects planned dozens have been cancelled, often forcing investors to write off substantial sums. But the bad news is that many are still under construction. Once work has begun, it is very hard for companies to go back on a major investment decision. Read more

National Tribute to The Victims of The Paris Terrorist Attacks At Les Invalides In Paris

Laurent Fabius  © Getty Images

The agreement on climate change in Paris will satisfy no one. The complaints are predictable and have already begun.

The commitments made are not legally binding and political decisions could be altered by future elections or regime changes. The funds available for adjustment are too limited and, of course, there is no carbon price.

All true, but politics is the art of the possible and what has been agreed is a triumph for French diplomacy and for the French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius personally. Many deserve credit but success depends on leadership. He is the Energy Personality of the Year because he has played a crucial role in changing how the sector will evolve worldwide for decades to come. Read more

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A pump turbine at Alstoms' global technology and hydropower centre in Grenoble, France  © Getty Images

Storage — whether of grain or of knowledge through the printed word — has been a crucial element in human development. Of all the many technical advances that are transforming the energy business none is potentially more important than storage: it give us the ability to control the way, and crucially the timing, of energy consumption. Used on a major scale it could help to make heat and light available to those outside the commercial economy and could radically alter the energy mix.

Two excellent recent research reports summarise the current state of the art in the field and offer some predictions. The first is from Lazards and is the latest in a series assessing trends in the costs of different mechanisms. The second is from Moody’s and concentrates on the advances being made in reducing the cost of batteries.

In discussing storage it is important to demolish two myths. First, the technological advances are not about to transform the energy system to the point where a major proportion of consumers defect from existing distribution systems. Second, it does not require a dramatic breakthrough for making it on a significant scale to become economic. Read more

George Osborne’s concept of a “Northern Powerhouse” is a good and timely idea. The UK economy is disproportionately skewed to London and the South East. Other regions need development and jobs. The cities of the North – from Liverpool and Manchester to Leeds and Sheffield provide a strong base with great potential. What they can achieve could provide a model for other neglected areas. But good ideas need to be translated into tangible actions. So here is one possibility – Northern Power – a municipal energy business for the North of England. Read more

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Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Vladimir Putin talk at the G20 summit in Antalya,Turkey, on November 16  © Getty Images

Russia is coming in from the cold. A full-scale reset of the relationship with the international community is well underway. A country that was a pariah state a few weeks ago, isolated by sanctions, is rapidly becoming an essential ally. What does this sudden turn of events mean for the energy business?

The reason for the reset is clear: the enemy of my enemy is my friend. The common enemy is the Islamist militant group Isis. For the Germans and for Chancellor Angela Merkel the destabilisation of Syria has opened up a flood tide of refugees. The warm welcome offered initially in Germany, Sweden and a few other parts of Europe has chilled. Something must be done to stop the flow at source.

For the French and many others across Europe, terrified by last week’s awful events in Paris, the identity of the enemy in Syria and the Middle East has also come into sharp focus. The same is true in Moscow where the downing of a Russian airliner over the Sinai desert has made those in the Kremlin realise that they, too, face a ruthless enemy. When set against the challenge of Isis nothing else matters much. Ukraine and all the other disputes can be assigned to a distant back burner — not solved but not allowed to get worse. It is time to work together. Read more

Optimism, however essential for human progress, can be very dangerous if misapplied or allowed to run to excess. There can be few better examples of this than the new review of India’s energy future published last week by the International Energy Agency. As you would expect, the paper is fascinating in its detailed description of India’s energy economy. But the forecasts are seriously over optimistic. They gloss over the challenges that even a radical modernising government in Delhi is not managing to overcome and they ignore the very real risks of a much less happy outcome. Read more

IRAN-VENEZUELA-DIPLOMACY

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani   © Getty Images

Step by step, month by month, the agreement between Iran and the international powers to control nuclear development in the country is moving forward. Beyond the rhetoric about whether the deal will be effective or not — a debate that will surely continue — the prospect of an end to some of the sanctions on Iran comes closer. What could that mean for the oil market?

The question has to be answered in two parts. First, the short term up to the end of 2016. Second, the longer term stretching to 2020 and beyond. On the first there is a clear consensus across the industry. Iran can produce and export perhaps another 400,000 barrels a day by the end of next year. The limit is set by the condition of existing fields and infrastructure. In the latest of a series of excellent and detailed papers, the US Energy Information Administration suggests the number could be a little higher but also cautions that the amount of condensate available may not be exportable because the market is saturated. That number of barrels a day would add a further dampener to the world price and might force producers in the US to shut in some more tight oil. It is not enough to change the game. Read more

A look at how a climate change deal could affect oil majors Read more