Areva

View inside the Hunterston B nuclear power station

Inside the Hunterston B nuclear power station in Scotland  © Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

2015 will be a crucial year for the nuclear industry across the world. Japan is expected to start bringing its nuclear reactors back on stream — four years after the Fukushima disaster. Elsewhere, a dozen different countries are considering whether or not to commit to new plants, with the decisions further complicated by the fall in the price of competing fuels such as coal and natural gas. Much depends on what happens in the UK, where the progress of proposed new developments will signal whether nuclear can be competitive as a long term source of energy. Read more

By the end of this week bids must be in from the consortia seeking to develop the UK’s new generation of nuclear power stations. It is decision time but the irony is that the key decisions will be taken in Paris rather than London. Read more

The announcement that Areva are to join with China’s Guangdong Nuclear Power Holding Company to bid for new capacity in the UK represents a bold statement in favour of globalisation and against established judgments of national energy security by the UK government.

The traditional view has been that the UK’s strategic resources should be under the control of nationally controlled or “friendly” entities.   When BP’s privatisation in the 1980s failed in the face of a market downturn and more than 20 per cent of the shares were picked up by the Kuwaitis, Mrs Thatcher reacted vigorously and the Kuwaitis were forced to sell down.

The main concern has been Russia. Read more