Department of energy and climate change

July promises to be a busy month in Whitehall Place, the home of the UK’s Energy and Climate Change Department. Unfortunately, however, despite the prospect of a flurry of activity it seems as if all key decisions will still be left on hold. Read more >>

Burbo Bank Wind Farm, River Mersey
Finally, the UK’s energy policy is taking shape after months of confusion. At its heart is a realisation that, while some decisions are urgent, others can wait. Time and timing matter. The approach is practical as well as political but it won’t suit everyone. And it leaves the biggest issue of all – climate change – unresolved. Read more >>

Having been pretty critical of the Department Of Energy and Climate Change in the past it is time to come to its defence.

It seems that Mr Francis Maude the Cabinet Office Minister and effectively head of Britain’s civil service has told his cabinet colleagues in the last few days that a further £8bn of “efficiency savings” can be found from Whitehall and local government. Read more >>

The UK’s Department for Energy and Climate Change has a new permanent secretary, as predicted before Christmas. The elegantly orchestrated process, along with a comparable process at the Home Office has reasserted the independence of the civil service appointments process. Sir David Normington, the first civil service commissioner is providing to be more than a match for Francis Maude, Theresa May and the others who want to make senior civil servants political appointees.

Stephen Lovegrove, the new man at the DECC, has a number of challenges to overcome. Read more >>

The Department of Energy and Climate Change survives. For the moment. One of the subtexts of last week’s government reshuffle in the UK was whether this was the right moment for a change in the layout of Whitehall with both the culture and energy departments abolished and their functions distributed elsewhere. In the end, the politics of the coalition made that too difficult. Instead, the DECC is being emasculated with several of its powers transferred elsewhere. What does this mean for energy policy and for companies and investors? Read more >>