EDF

This could be a chance to accelerate projects from lower cost nuclear providers, writes Nick Butler Read more

The French economy minister Emmanuel Macron visits the Civaux nuclear power plant operated by EDF, which is 85% owned by the state

The French economy minister Emmanuel Macron visits the Civaux nuclear power plant operated by EDF, which is 85 per cent owned by the state  © Getty Images

The saga of Hinkley Point goes on. The UK government is right to delay approval of a project in which it has lost confidence. The EDF board may have approved the deal to build a new nuclear power plant in Somerset, southwest England, but the obvious risks were such that the only prudent response is to pause and to reconsider all the options. The government must be right in wanting to avoid locking the UK into an expensive source of supply at a time when the costs of every alternative — including natural gas, solar and wind — are falling. In the post-Brexit world competitiveness is critical.

Theresa May, the prime minister, has also appreciated that approval of the project is now a UK bargaining chip in Britain’s relationship with the French. Cancelling the Hinkley project would destroy the thousands of jobs promised along the supply chain – most of which is located in France. The pressure is now on President François Hollande, who faces a very difficult re-election campaign next year, to force EDF to come up with a much better offer. Read more

The board of EDF meets in Paris on Thursday morning to discuss its long-planned investment in a new nuclear power station at Hinkley Point in Somerset, southwest England. There is speculation that the meeting will come to a definitive decision after years of delay. If the outcome is to go ahead, the French company has work to do in rebuilding trust. So what should investors and consumers be looking for ?

To begin with, it is important to put aside the fanciful idea that the announcement is simply a matter of French politics. Most of the jobs created by Hinkley will be in the supply chain in France and the argument is that President François Hollande needs to ensure that they are not put at risk before the presidential election next year. Read more

Greg Clark leaves 10 Downing Street as the new business, energy and industrial strategy secretary

Greg Clark leaves 10 Downing Street as the new business, energy and industrial strategy secretary  © Getty Images

A changing of the guard in an organisation is a good time at which to pause and reconsider every aspect of strategy. The mistakes of the past can be admitted, entrenched but outdated positions can be quietly left behind and altered circumstances accepted. That is what should happen now in the UK in relation to energy policy. Read more

Construction of the EPR at Flamanville, northwest France

Construction of the EPR at Flamanville, northwest France   © Getty Images

The cloud of doubt around EDF’s long-planned new nuclear plant at Hinkley Point in Somerset continues to grow.

The final investment decision has been delayed yet again. The start up date has been put back to 2026 – nine years behind the original schedule. A new contingency, amounting to £2.7bn, has been added to the cost of the project.

Now, in a remarkably frank interview the French energy minister, Segolene Royal has said that the company may have been “carried away” by its enthusiasm for the project and has joined the chorus of internal staff and engineers in warning of the risks to EDF’s finances from going ahead. But although Hinkley inevitably gets all the attention in the British press, EDF’s real problem is to be found in the half constructed plant at Flamanville on the Cotentin Peninsula on the other side of the English Channel. Read more

George Osborne Visits North Sea oil in Scotland

George Osborne on the Montrose Platform in the North Sea  © Getty Images

On Wednesday, George Osborne will present the UK budget to the House of Commons. At a moment of deep uncertainty for the country’s energy industry — which is discouraging investment and creating quite unnecessary risks for the future. From the North Sea to Hinkley Point and shale there is confusion and doubt. Mr Osborne should come forward with a package of messages to restore confidence. Here are four obvious steps the chancellor should take.

First, the North Sea is now on the verge of a serious cutback in activity that will reduce energy supply and lead to lost jobs as well as much lower tax revenues. The hopes expressed in Sir Ian Wood’s report two years ago for an renaissance in the North Sea and the development of the billions of barrels of remaining resources will be lost. Read more

The engine room at the Flamanville nuclear reactor  © Getty Images

The news that there is to be a further delay to the long-promised Hinkley Point nuclear power station in Somerset should come as no surprise to those who have followed the saga over the last eight years. As the FT report on Monday confirmed, the board of EDF wishes to delay the project for another year . That could easily turn into two years or three or more because it depends on the resolution of the deep problems at Flamanville in France, where a similar reactor is being built, and on the company’s financial health, which is fragile.

The EDF board is right to seek a delay. It is the only rational decision for EDF as a company and in reality for the UK. Whatever the embarrassment involved it is impossible to proceed with a project where the risks and ultimate costs are unknown. The resistance to the project from managers and staff within EDF is very telling. The UK government must accept that Hinkley will not be built for the foreseeable future.

But what comes next ? Read more

The UK plan is uneconomic for owners and consumers, writes Nick Butler Read more

British Government Signs A Deal For New Nuclear Power Plant

EDF's existing nuclear power plants at Hinkley Point  © Getty Images

The announcement that some form of funding structure for Britain’s nuclear new build at Hinkley Point in Somerset has been agreed must be read with care. UK consumers and taxpayers are not allowed to see the whole agreement — that privilege is restricted to the French and Chinese governments and their state-owned enterprises — but it is clear that this week’s statements do not amount to the final deal. Much remains to be negotiated, with the UK at a considerable disadvantage because of its all too evident desperation to complete a deal.

Much attention has focused on the relationship between the UK and China, on the cyber security risks of allowing the Chinese to own, construct and operate a plant of their own in the UK and on the political consequences of the deal for George Osborne, the chancellor of the exchequer who is now known to the black humorists of Whitehall as the Manchurian Candidate. The other, and potentially more serious, issue is what the announcement and the further delay it implies means for UK energy policy. Read more

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Construction at EDF's EPR project in Flamanville, France  © Getty Images

Strong and capable energy ministers are rare but the UK government appears to have found one in the person of Andrea Leadsom. Ms Leadsom is nominally the Minister of State in the Department of Energy and Climate Change (ie the number 2) but that is a detail. She is not crippled by self-doubt and initially hesitated for many hours before taking the job. Perhaps energy did not seem important enough. Perhaps number 2 was the wrong number.

Unsurprisingly, however, she has rapidly mastered the brief and appears to be finding that the subject is more interesting and the policy issues more complex and important than she had imagined. The question now is whether she can use her authority to force a better bargain for energy consumers by negotiating a new and improved deal with the owners of the long-planned and much-postponed Hinkley Point nuclear power station. Read more

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Protests against the reopening of the Sendai nuclear plant  © Getty Images

Within the next few weeks the Japanese utility Kyushu Electric Power will restart its two nuclear power reactors at Sandei in the Kagoshima prefecture in the far south of the country. Fuel loading is set to begin July and the plants should be onstream again in August. After four years of crisis and much legal and political debate, the Japanese nuclear industry is finally on the way back. The implications for the rest of the energy sector in Asia and across the world are significant.

The two reactors at Sandei have been closed since 2011. From a nuclear fleet of 50 reactors capable of producing some 47 GW of electricity and supplying over 30 per cent of Japan’s daily electricity needs at the beginning of 2011, the sector’s output shrank to zero in the months following the Fukushima disaster. At Fukushima itself six reactors have been closed and are being decommissioned. The rest of Japan’s nuclear fleet stands cold and unused. Gradually, however, the negative mood of 2011 has abated. Now the operators of 24 different reactors across the country have applied for permission to reopen with the full and very active co-operation of the Japanese state and the powerful industrial lobbies such as the Kaidanren and the Keizai DoyukaiRead more

FRANCE-ENERGY-NUCLEAR-COMPANY-EDF-ELECTRICITY

  © Getty Images

“I am convinced that the nuclear industry has a future, that it is a strength of our country.” The fact that Manuel Valls, the prime minister, had to make such a statement in the National Assembly in Paris two weeks ago is a dramatic indication of the depths of the problems the nuclear sector in France is facing. Read more

British Government Signs A Deal For New Nuclear Power Plant

  © Getty Images

The election is over and against all expectations we have a clear result. When it comes to energy policy, however, the agenda will be set not by what the Conservative party has promised in its manifesto but by external events. A number of looming issues are already obvious and the government will have no control over most of them.

The first is the further postponement of the plans for nuclear development starting at Hinkley Point in Somerset. Two new reactors capable of supplying some 7 per cent of total UK electricity demand are planned. The first was originally supposed to be on stream in time to cook Christmas dinner in 2017. But despite the prospect of a lavish price — index linked for 35 years regardless of what happens to global energy prices – and £10bn of even more generous financial guarantees, funding for the investment required is not in place. The reluctance of investors to commit will not be helped by the technical problems in the reactor vessels, which are now under investigation by the French nuclear regulator. This problem has widespread implications for the companies involved (Areva and EDF) and for nuclear development in many countries across the world, starting with France itself. Read more

View inside the Hunterston B nuclear power station

Inside the Hunterston B nuclear power station in Scotland  © Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

2015 will be a crucial year for the nuclear industry across the world. Japan is expected to start bringing its nuclear reactors back on stream — four years after the Fukushima disaster. Elsewhere, a dozen different countries are considering whether or not to commit to new plants, with the decisions further complicated by the fall in the price of competing fuels such as coal and natural gas. Much depends on what happens in the UK, where the progress of proposed new developments will signal whether nuclear can be competitive as a long term source of energy. Read more

  © Christophe Lehenaff / Getty Images

How far will the French government go in selling off some of its extensive portfolio of assets? In its last budget, the government said it would sell up to €4bn in shareholdings to raise money to pay down debt, or to invest in other companies. This could foreseeably include selling off parts of the government’s stakes in energy companies such as GDF Suez and EDF. But more may be necessary.

The ongoing conflict with the European Union over France’s persistent deficit, which according to the finance minister Michel Sapin cannot now be closed before 2017, is damaging France’s reputation as well as the all important relationship with Berlin. Some action is needed to buy German acceptance of a new timetable. Selling assets in itself would not solve the problem but could reduce debt levels and produce much needed revenue. As a concept, however, privatisation is still considered toxic in France. The terms of any sale will have to reflect these political constraints.

Any Brit commenting on France has to be careful after the childish abuse from Andy Street, the managing director (for the moment) of retailer John Lewis. France has its problems, as any Frenchman will tell you, but it is not “finished” or a country where “nothing works and nobody cares”. Mr Street should visit the thriving areas of the South West. He should remember that France, supposedly so hostile to globalisation, has 31 companies in the latest Fortune 500 listing against 28 each from Germany and the ultra-global UK. I hope that the Franco British Council, the Colloque and the other institutions that have laboured for years to build good relations with France are evidence that Mr Street speaks for no-one but himself. Read more

The sun sets behind Hinkley Point B, and (R) Hinkley Point A nuclear power stations besides the Bristol Channel near Bridgwater on November 12, 2013 in Somerset, England (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  © Matt Cardy/Getty Images

The EU approval of the nuclear development at Hinkley Point marks an important, if not decisive, chapter in the story of new nuclear in the UK. There are still legal challenges to be overcome and a financing package to be finalised within the constraints set by the EU ruling but this is a good moment to identify winners and losers.

The obvious losers are the UK’s consumers who are trapped into paying a price for electricity that is double the current wholesale price for 35 years after the plant starts up. The deal will go down in history, alongside the privatisation of the Royal Mail, as an example of the inability of the British government – ministers and civil servants alike – to negotiate complex commercial deals. The phrase “rolled over” will enter the French language and be accompanied always with a Gallic smile. Still, one should recognise talent and so chapeau to the French negotiators. Read more

The Chinese, as reported by my colleague Guy Chazan, are in talks with EDF on sharing the costs of building the new nuclear plant at Hinkley Point in Somerset. Their price is an unspecified “degree of control”. The Russian company Rosatom announced a couple of weeks ago that it was considering joining the game with the aim of building future nuclear stations in the UK. Perhaps we should be grateful that such nice people have taken an interest in the UK’s energy needs. But before we roll over in gratitude perhaps we should consider the links between energy and security. Read more

Nearly. That was my summary of the state of negotiations between the UK government and EDF on new nuclear last month. Nearly but not quite as comments by Ed Davey over the past week make clear. The government had hoped to make a positive announcement before the summer but it is now looking at the prospect of more months of further talks. A deal, intended by ministers in London to represent a final offer, was put on the table four weeks ago. EDF in Paris, where all the energy company’s decisions are made, has failed to respond.

Frustrated by the unwillingness of EDF to engage, the government, which wanted to do a deal and thought an agreement was possible after the last Anglo-French summit in May, has now effectively stepped back and is talking to other possible suppliers. Read more

As the FT reported on Friday, negotiations on the terms for new nuclear have advanced and there is increasing optimism that a deal can be done. The meeting between David Cameron and Francois Hollande in Paris two weeks ago amounted to a declaration of agreement in principle. Just three issues remain to be resolved. Read more

Behind the continuing negotiations on new nuclear in the UK one big question remains unanswered. Who is going to pay? Senior officials are concerned that the pressure to close a deal is undermining a sensible negotiating strategy by separating the terms – including the strike price and the issues of risk allocation – from the question of funding.

To grasp what is happening you have to understand the degree of desperation which now exists in Government to deliver growth. Growth is the justification of the whole economic strategy and of course the solution to the challenge of rising borrowing. Growth is seen as the only platform from which either coalition party can go back to the electorate. But growth is elusive and time is running out. Read more