Energy companies

The rumours that Vladimir Putin is about to replace Aleksey Miller as the chief executive of Gazprom continue to swirl around the markets across Europe. As usual it is hard to know what is true and what is dreamt up by Mr Miller’s enemies. Removing Mr Miller would not, however, solve Gazprom’s problems. What the company really needs is a new strategy. What should it be. ? 

After Nick Butler’s post on David Cameron’s energy policy John Kay writes about the complexity of retail energy tariffs and how the simplification of these will not be easy.

Last week, David Cameron told the House of Commons that UK energy suppliers will be required to ensure that all their customers benefit from the lowest tariff. Coincidentally, Britain’s energy regulator Ofgem published a document proposing simplification of retail energy tariffs. The document demonstrated that simplification will be complicated. Certainly more complicated than the prime minister’s statement implied. 

David Cameron is the first prime minister in living memory who has not employed a business policy adviser in Number 10. The lack of such an adviser is all too evident in the continuing shambles around the UK’s energy policy.

Picking up public irritation with rising electricity and gas bills, the PM declared that companies would be compelled to supply customers on the basis of the lowest tariff available. This signals a real lack of understanding of how business works. The rapid consequence of such a policy would be to push all tariffs up and to remove any incentive on any supplier to provide competitive packages to end users.