energy prices

You don’t have to believe that freezing consumer energy prices is good public policy to see that just three sentences in Ed Miliband’s speech to the Labour party conference in September transformed the energy scene in the UK. The opposition leader’s comments sent a chill through the market, reducing the value of utility stocks and has left the coalition government struggling to respond to a completely unexpected outbreak of populism. The consequences of the speech, intended and unintended, run on and could yet force a change in energy policy across the EU. 

Sir John Major has hit some raw nerves in the UK government with his comments on “lace curtain poverty” and the harsh impact of rising energy bills. But to pin the blame on the energy companies is wrong and runs the risk of making a bad situation worse.

The former British prime minister alleges that the companies – unnamed but presumably the utilities and the suppliers of raw materials to those utilities – are profiteering. I hope he will show us all the detailed evidence. If that evidence exists, and if there is a cartel of any sort, it is a matter for Her Majesty’s constabulary. 

When I first wrote about shale gas in the FT, back in 2011, one very senior oil industry executive told me that I was badly wrong and that shale would never have an impact beyond perhaps a couple of small areas in the US. A year later he did have the good grace to apologise.

Now shale gas is everywhere – from Ukraine, to China to South Africa (those are just the places where major investments were announced last week). There are still those who deny the importance of shale development, but like those who deny climate change they are beginning to look increasingly out of touch.