energy prices

Theresa May

Theresa May  © Getty Images

Theresa May needs an energy policy adviser. I hasten to add that this is not a job application – but someone is needed to pull together the necessary reforms and to help the UK prime minister avoid self-destructive mistakes such as an attempt to take charge of fixing energy prices.

The predominant view in Whitehall – from the Treasury to the business department which is now responsible for energy – is that current policies are mistaken and require radical reform. Those policies take no account of the structural fall in energy prices; the failure of new nuclear to live up to its promise; the changing pattern of demand; and, most important of all, the transformation in the global energy market being brought about by a range of new technologies. Read more

 

For most of those involved in the energy sector 2016 has been a year to forget. Oil prices have risen a little but despite the Opec deal are still almost 50 per cent down on where they were 2 years ago. Gas and coal prices are also down. Some US coal companies are in a desperate financial position – as are some of the smaller oil and gas businesses who do not have the deep pockets necessary to survive a downturn which is both cyclical and structural. Read more

You don’t have to believe that freezing consumer energy prices is good public policy to see that just three sentences in Ed Miliband’s speech to the Labour party conference in September transformed the energy scene in the UK. The opposition leader’s comments sent a chill through the market, reducing the value of utility stocks and has left the coalition government struggling to respond to a completely unexpected outbreak of populism. The consequences of the speech, intended and unintended, run on and could yet force a change in energy policy across the EU. Read more

Sir John Major has hit some raw nerves in the UK government with his comments on “lace curtain poverty” and the harsh impact of rising energy bills. But to pin the blame on the energy companies is wrong and runs the risk of making a bad situation worse.

The former British prime minister alleges that the companies – unnamed but presumably the utilities and the suppliers of raw materials to those utilities – are profiteering. I hope he will show us all the detailed evidence. If that evidence exists, and if there is a cartel of any sort, it is a matter for Her Majesty’s constabulary. Read more

When I first wrote about shale gas in the FT, back in 2011, one very senior oil industry executive told me that I was badly wrong and that shale would never have an impact beyond perhaps a couple of small areas in the US. A year later he did have the good grace to apologise.

Now shale gas is everywhere – from Ukraine, to China to South Africa (those are just the places where major investments were announced last week). There are still those who deny the importance of shale development, but like those who deny climate change they are beginning to look increasingly out of touch. Read more