energy shortage

A postwar power cut; London 1947 (Photo by Reg Birkett/Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

A power cut in London in 1947 © Reg Birkett/Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Developed industrial economies should not be at risk of power blackouts in any but the most extreme and exceptional circumstances. The ability to anticipate demand and to put in place spare capacity may not be available to the poorest economies of sub Saharan Africa but it is certainly available in the UK. The risks of a tightening balance of capacity and demand have been obvious and widely discussed for at least the past three years. To have reached the point where National Grid are having to issue warnings and to tell some consumers that they will have to agree contracts which allow the supplies they need to be interrupted because of potential shortages of supply is shameful. Read more

There is absolutely no need for an energy shortage in the UK, but the indecision of policy makers is making serious problems over the next few years ever more likely. There is no shortage of supply – but the raw materials of the energy business – such as gas and coal, or for that matter wind – have to be converted into power to produce the electricity which is essential for a complex modern economy. If the power stations are not in place electricity can’t be produced. Read more