George Osborne

Construction of the EPR at Flamanville, northwest France

Construction of the EPR at Flamanville, northwest France   © Getty Images

The cloud of doubt around EDF’s long-planned new nuclear plant at Hinkley Point in Somerset continues to grow.

The final investment decision has been delayed yet again. The start up date has been put back to 2026 – nine years behind the original schedule. A new contingency, amounting to £2.7bn, has been added to the cost of the project.

Now, in a remarkably frank interview the French energy minister, Segolene Royal has said that the company may have been “carried away” by its enthusiasm for the project and has joined the chorus of internal staff and engineers in warning of the risks to EDF’s finances from going ahead. But although Hinkley inevitably gets all the attention in the British press, EDF’s real problem is to be found in the half constructed plant at Flamanville on the Cotentin Peninsula on the other side of the English Channel. Read more

British Government Signs A Deal For New Nuclear Power Plant

EDF's existing nuclear power plants at Hinkley Point  © Getty Images

The announcement that some form of funding structure for Britain’s nuclear new build at Hinkley Point in Somerset has been agreed must be read with care. UK consumers and taxpayers are not allowed to see the whole agreement — that privilege is restricted to the French and Chinese governments and their state-owned enterprises — but it is clear that this week’s statements do not amount to the final deal. Much remains to be negotiated, with the UK at a considerable disadvantage because of its all too evident desperation to complete a deal.

Much attention has focused on the relationship between the UK and China, on the cyber security risks of allowing the Chinese to own, construct and operate a plant of their own in the UK and on the political consequences of the deal for George Osborne, the chancellor of the exchequer who is now known to the black humorists of Whitehall as the Manchurian Candidate. The other, and potentially more serious, issue is what the announcement and the further delay it implies means for UK energy policy. Read more

George Osborne in his Budget speech on Wednesday talked, correctly, about US industrial energy costs being half those of the UK. The situation has deteriorated rapidly over the past five years. His proposed response is worth quoting directly:

“We need to cut our energy costs. We’re going to do this by investing in new sources of energy: new nuclear power, renewables, and a shale gas revolution.”

This must be a speechwriter’s joke. A line written in where the content bears absolutely no relationship to reality. New nuclear at £92.50 a megawatt hour will double the current wholesale price of electricity. New offshore wind on the Department of Energy & Climate Change’s own figures, which many feel are too low, will cost more than £120/Mwhr. These are not secret figures. They are well known in the Treasury, as is the risk of generating capacity failing to meet demand. There was no mention of that little problem. Read more