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Why are renewables losing out? According to the International Energy Agency, renewables, excluding biomass but including hydro, currently provide just 8 per cent of global electricity supply and 3 per cent of total energy demand. By 2035 on the IEA’s main scenario those figures will rise to just 15 and 7 per cent respectively. That represents some serious growth but not a breakthrough. Hydrocarbons on all the IEA scenarios will still be providing well over 60 per cent of final energy. The figure could be higher if shale gas and tight oil developments spread from the US and if coal prices fall further.

This limited achievement comes despite a decade of high spending on research – especially in the US, and despite a variety of generous subsidies – ranging from direct grants and feed-in tariffs, to protected market shares. In the UK, the support is entrenched in legislation requiring the government to produce long-term plans for reducing emissions over the next four decades. Renewables have benefitted over the past few years from concerns about rising energy prices and energy security, as well as from the desire to tackle climate change. Read more >>