Kurdistan

The borders drawn by Churchill and other politicians in the aftermath of the First World War have shaped the Middle East for almost 100 years. Now, however, sectarian upheaval combined with the US withdrawing from day-to-day engagement suggests that those boundaries could be redrawn as a result of the shifting balance of power on the ground. That process has started in northern Iraq and won’t stop there. The redrawing of the maps will have profound implications for the energy business. Read more

Last week I wrote about the forthcoming independence referendum in Kurdistan. To move from events there to what is happening in Scotland is a surreal experience. In Erbil the vote will be a deadly serious matter which could create a new country for a nation which as they say has no friends but the mountains having been a victim of international betrayal and cynicism for centuries. There is no knowing whether the Kurdish referendum will end in triumph or tragedy. In Edinburgh what should be an equally serious debate about breaking the relationship with the rest of the UK is now close to a farce. Read more

Flying east over the mountains into the new international airport of Erbil, the administrative capital of Kurdistan, you are conscious of entering history. Times past – how many wars just have been fought around the citadel in Erbil – one of the oldest known settlements in continuous occupation in the world – over its 5,000 year history? But also current history because what is happening in Erbil now could reshape not just Iraq but the rest of the Middle East. And, almost incidentally, the world oil market. Read more