nuclear

A number of well-sourced reports over the past two days suggest that, as predicted, we are on the edge of a deal for the construction of new nuclear power stations in the UK.

The champagne corks however are not quite popping either in Whitehall or in Paris. Read more

For some years I used to bet on the end year oil price with Ed Crooks. He usually won.

I thought for 2013 a wider challenge would be a better test for FT readers.

So here are six questions: Read more

Government plays at panto with energy policy. Getty Images

And so the UK energy policy saga continues. Recently it was all wind and decarbonisation. Now it is about gas and shale.

Each step is presented as the answer – definitive and final – but behind that rhetoric is the slippery suggestion of another review of the policy in 2016, which makes everything decidedly temporary.

In the Department of Energy and Climate Change itself, pantomime season has come early this year. Jack and the Wind Turbines will be performed by an all-star cast. Young Greg, played by Kenneth Williams, and followed everywhere by a small dog, goes around planting windmills – “look behind you, there’s another”. He is followed around by the Rev. John, played by Ronnie Barker, proclaiming wind to be wicked, contrary to the word of the Lord and trying to pull them down. Led, if that is the word, by Mr Davey, an eternally optimistic but increasingly emotional character, caught beautifully by Tony Hancock, our heroes wander around looking for an energy policy on which they can agree. Read more

Germany turns to renewables. Image by Getty

The future of the euro and the fate of Greece and Spain are not the only issues on which the key decisions are now taken in Berlin. As Gideon Rachman wrote the other day Berlin has taken its place as the centre of power in Europe, easily eclipsing Brussels.

On energy too, the policy choices made in the German Chancellery will shape what happens to the market across Europe and beyond. The only problem is that as in the case of the euro there is a marked reluctance in Berlin to take hard decisions. German politics work by consensus and reaching that consensus can take a long time. The result is that policy drifts and investment grinds to a halt. That is what is happening now. Read more

Japanese company Hitachi buys into nuclear

The news that Hitachi has paid what seems a high price for the Horizon franchise to build new nuclear stations in the UK is good news for the industry. Hitachi has a strong balance sheet and a good technical record – untarnished by Japan’s Fukushima incident. The deal is a tribute to the Department of Energy and Climate Change officials involved and to Number 10′s strong support for the nuclear programme.

Now, only two questions remain. What price will UK consumers pay for nuclear generated power and who will fund EDF’s initial investment in Hinkley Point.

After a long and successful campaign to make nuclear power acceptable within the UK the companies involved in the industry seem to be jeopardising further progress by refusing to spell out the detailed costs of the new nuclear stations they want to build. Read more