peak oil

When will oil demand peak ? The very fact that the question focuses on demand rather than supply is in itself remarkable, given where conventional wisdom on the subject stood only a decade ago. Now there is a consensus that demand will peak first but there is no agreement on when that peak will come. Shell speculated a few weeks ago that it would be within five to 15 years. The Opec producers’ cartel suggested recently that the peak could come in about 2029. But the International Energy Agency in its latest World Energy Outlook predicts that oil demand will be rising up to 2040. Read more

Energy demand in China appears to have decoupled from GDP

Energy demand in China appears to have decoupled from GDP  © Getty Images

The changes taking place in the world energy market are not just a matter of oversupply or the unwillingness of Saudi Arabia to rein in production. Demand has stagnated and in some areas is falling. The fall is unexpected — all the standard projections still cheerfully predict ever rising demand driven by population growth and the spread of prosperity in emerging economies. That assumption, however, begins to look too simplistic. The reality is more complex and, for producers, much more challenging. Forget the old debate about peak oil. Now it seems we are approaching peak energy. Read more

US oil rig. Getty Images

I have always been sceptical of the extensive theories of peak oil built around the study first published in 1956 by M King Hubbert. Those studies have always seemed to ignore the reality of technical progress that opens new frontiers and reduces costs. They have been much used to support the idea that oil prices should be ever increasing, on the basis that scarcity should be reflected in high prices.

The reality is that oil provinces (think of the North Sea) keep going well beyond their original schedule, and recovery rates from established fields keep rising. On average, even after some advances in reservoir management technology, only some 50 per cent of the oil in place is recovered from most fields, so there is a long way still to go. On top of that, we now have tight oil (the oil equivalent of shale gas), which BP in its latest Long Term Outlook now expects to provide some 9 per cent of global production in 2030. Read more

Oil fields in Iraq. Image by Getty

The International Monetary Fund is not well known for its expertise on the energy sector and the oil market. A new paper just published by the organisation on the possible future for oil and the world economy is not likely to correct that impression. Ignoring much of the evidence, the authors try to breathe life into the old theory of “peak oil”.

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