tight oil

Boom Goes Bust: Texas Oil Industry Hurt By Plunging Oil Prices

A worker washes a truck used to carry sand for fracking in Odessa, Texas  © Getty Images

If you live in Europe you could be forgiven for thinking that the shale revolution is strictly an American phenomenon. Casual readers could also easily get the idea that low oil and gas prices are driving down US production of shale gas and tight oil and that even there the revolution is over. All these impressions are mistaken.

Shale development in Europe is virtually non-existent. Fracking is banned in France and discouraged in Germany. In Poland, early results have been disappointing while in the UK, thanks to mistakes by the government and the industry, no drilling has taken place for several years. Starting operations in Balcome — a wealthy and vocal community with no economic imperative to give up its peaceful lifestyle was a mistake. Creating great expectations without putting in place either proper incentives or a clear regulatory framework was a serious policy error. There is talk of a few wells being drilled this year but probably only if local objections can be overridden by edicts from Whitehall — a crass process somewhat at odds with the government’s rhetoric about devolving power to local communities. The approach is not likely to win over hearts and minds and may well prove unenforceable in a number of areas. Read more

Readers will be familiar with the issue of shale gas - its potential to change the world energy market and the controversies surrounding its development. But you might be less familiar with tight oil – oil from shale rock which can also be extracted by hydraulic fracturing. That is the next story and its development particularly in the UK will be every bit as controversial. Even the publication of the initial basic survey of the resources in place is being held up by political nervousness. Read more

Few countries can afford to turn away from the prospect of developing 5bn bbl of oil, but France, as ever, is exceptional. François Hollande, the socialist president, has refused to allow hydraulic fracking. In France, fracking is associated in the public mind with shale gas – a form of energy which is thought of, alongside Anglo-Saxon banks, McDonalds and other manifestations of globalisation, as fundamentally un-French and therefore bad.

France has plenty of shale gas which will now never be developed, presumably. The president’s announcement did not mention the country’s ‘tight oil’ resources. The question being asked in Paris is whether Mr Hollande knew just how great the prize of tight oil could be. Read more