wind power

China is restructuring its domestic coal industry

China is restructuring its domestic coal industry  © Getty Images

What are the implications of China’s announcement last week that it will be spending $360m over the next four years to build up its renewable energy sector? There are many reasons behind the move, from Beijing’s growing concern about the impact of climate change to the political imperative of reducing low level pollution in the smog-ridden cities. The scale of the investment, however, suggests that two closely related policy objectives are driving energy strategy: an effort to create a modernised economy that can provide employment for the Chinese workforce and a determination to limit dependence on imported supplies.

Two weeks ago, in looking ahead to the potential stories of 2017, I suggested that Beijing might set a target of energy independence by 2025. This provoked a range of responses. Some people told me that such a policy was unnecessary since the country can afford to pay whatever is necessary. Others did not believe anything close to self-sufficiency was attainable. Read more

If any company knows about the highs and lows of the British economy, it is Merseyside’s Cammell Laird – one of the oldest names in British shipbuilding.

Founded nearly 200 years ago, its sprawling yards across the river from the city of Liverpool have launched more than 1,350 vessels, from a US Confederate raider to the steamer built for Dr Livingstone’s Zambezi expedition.

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The growth of wind farms and other renewable energy projects is heading for a sharp slowdown after 2020 according to official forecasts, despite ministers’ claims they want the UK to become a global centre of green power.

Figures from the Department of Energy and Climate Change predict a tenfold increase in the amount of new renewable power capacity added between 2012 and 2020.

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Scroby Sands offshore wind farm in Norfolk, just two miles off Britain's east coast. Image by Getty

A good rule in politics is never to take on those who care about a particular issue more than you do. I was in Norfolk at the weekend and came face to face with the new force in UK politics – a regiment of middle-aged ladies burning with indignation and determined to use their considerable powers of organisation to protect what they hold dear.

The issue at stake is not Europe, which is the obsession at Westminster, or the recession, or gay marriage. The issue is the growth of wind farms and the march across the beautiful Norfolk coast of developers planting the farms in order to milk the generous subsidies on offer. Norfolk, of course, is not an isolated case. Read more

Vast onshore wind farms are not a viable option for the UK

Barring a last minute intervention by the Treasury, the UK government will publish its new energy bill within the next few days. As it stands, the bill is a triumph of politics over economics and common sense – a symbolic victory for the Liberal Democrats designed to keep the coalition’s unhappy marriage together.

The problem is that serious investors will not believe a bill that reinforces subsidies to onshore wind, puts no hard numbers on the subsidies necessary for nuclear new build, sidelines the potential of energy efficiency and further technological advances, and completely ignores the issue of energy costs and competitiveness. Read more