Ed Miliband

The pension reforms announced at the Budget have jolted Westminster from its pre-election ennui. Conservatives and Liberal Democrats are cock-a-hoop. But “It has been a disorienting few days for the opposition”, as Rafael Behr writes.

This is what can happen when a new policy is as uncompromisingly ideological as the change to annuities. Most of the objectives for government policy are not inherently divisive; parties tend to disagree over means rather than ends. In this case, however, the chancellor succeeded in making whether one supports or opposes the idea of voluntary annuities a case study in moral discombobulation. Read more

Ed Miliband’s announcement on the EU in the Financial Times today is partly a recognition of this:

But it is also made with a keen awareness of this:

The Labour leader is trying to stem the bleeding of support from his party to those on the right. Europe might not be a salient issue but in today’s populist climate, it is a symbolic one. Read more

“Equality of What?” asked Amartya Sen in 1979. The question pithily captures the defining debate of the political left. On Monday evening, in his Hugo Young speech, Ed Miliband gave an answer to Sen’s question: (nearly) everything. Read more

David Cameron announced the figures in the Sun, which shows a picture of him next to a snap of Margaret Thatcher promoting her Right to Buy scheme. It should not take too long to figure out the prime minister’s preferred interpretation of the first figures relating to the mortgage guarantee scheme: the only bubble Help to Buy is inflating is one of happiness in the hearts of ordinary people. Read more

In 1894, Mark Oldroyd, a Liberal MP with a fondness for mill girls and justice, published a pamphlet about the living wage. The textiles factory owner from Dewsbury, Yorkshire wrote that: “A living wage must be sufficient to maintain the worker in the highest state of industrial efficiency, with decent surroundings and sufficient leisure”. It was the first formal call for a wage which met the basic needs of a worker and his family. Notably, it was also a deliberate effort to preserve the value and moral worth of work itself. Read more

There is no obvious middle ground between building all of HS2 and not building all of HS2. The estimated benefits are higher over time and the further it goes towards Manchester and Leeds. And if the money is not spent on HS2 a large share of it will still have to go on increasing capacity. So far at least the opposition has accepted the argument that HS2 is the best way to do that.  Read more

A sequel to the earlier post about the battle between the Daily Mail and Ed Miliband. This morning, the Labour leader wrote to the paper’s proprietor to request an investigation into why a reporter from the Mail on Sunday attended a family memorial uninvited. The story is clearly not over. So I thought it worth sharing some research into an aspect of the saga – the relationship between the political beliefs of parents and children. Read more

The newspaper says it wants to discuss “the views of his father and their influence on Britain’s would-be Prime Minister.” No man can hear the “distant footsteps” of another’s father, as the poet Cesar Vallejo wrote. But the Mail is wrong. Its implication is that a Miliband premiership would be an exercise in proving his father right. However, if we must personalise it, his government would be better cast as an effort to prove Tony Blair wrong. Read more

Ed Miliband is not the only political leader to recognise the importance of rising energy bills. But in promising a price freeze he now “owns” the issue. The move tells us a lot about the Labour leader – including how he would govern if he became prime minister. Read more