The BBC sport site had its busiest day ever on Sunday as people flocked to watch Olympics coverage online, reports Rob Budden.

The BBC is delivering 24 simultaneous live channels over the web covering all the events at the Games. That equates to a total of 2,500 hours of coverage – 1,000 hours more than the Beijing Games.

On Sunday bbc.co.uk/sport had 8.3m global browsers – 2.2m of these overseas. These are big numbers. Indeed, the Olympics may well emerge as a key event in changing viewing habits for millions, with many no doubt watching sports content online for the first time. Read more

General Electric chief executive, Jeff Immelt, is in town for the games, which GE sponsors, and happy to talk about most Olympian matters, except one: Mitt Romney, writes Pilita Clark.

“I’m not going to touch that one,” said Mr Immelt, when invited to comment on the storm of controversy stirred when the Republican presidential contender said Olympic-eve stories of immigration officer strikes and private security personnel shortages were “disconcerting”. The comments had prompted Boris Johnson, London mayor, to encourage a crowd of thousands in Hyde Park to roar their disapproval at Mr Romney for appearing to suggest the capital was not ready to host the games. Read more

The editor of FT Weekend, Caroline Daniel, came across this handmade sign in a London cab earlier this week. It serves as a nice illustration of Hannah Kuchler’s story from today’s newspaper, from which: Read more

Just published on our Business blog: 

There’s a tantalising glimpse of Oliver O’Brien’s wonderful interactive map of London (and the UK) in Tuesday’s FT. The map is in the style of the great Charles Booth, who researched London poverty 120 years ago and displayed it cartographically. Our analysis contains the sobering observation by Mr O’Brien that “London’s mix of rich and poor changes dramatically from street to street. But what you see even 120 years after Booth is that many of the patterns remain the same”.

Visitors to the Olympic Games may want to take a look at the map before heading for the Olympic park to gain a little socio-economic perspective amid the glitz and hoop-la. As my colleagues James Pickford and Chris Giles write in their analysis:

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Just published from Material World:

Yesterday the relaxation of the UK’s Sunday trading laws during Olympic season (aka until sept 9) went into effect. Now stores can stay open AS LONG AS THEY WANT (OMG! OMG!). Already, in retail circles gigantic revenue boosts are being predicted. In my circle, however, which admittedly, is a circle of one and thus possibly non-representative, the news was met by a raised eyebrow.

I just can’t quite see how the Olympics, or Olympic fever, or whatever you want to call the emotion that is gripping London (and as far as I can tell, many people call it misery), will lead to a great surge in consumption of handbags, and denim, and all the other stuff that, say, Westfield Mall, one of the proponents of the extended hours and one that is about as far away from the Olympic stadiums as is possible while still being within city limits, say they expect.

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