Bangui

French soldiers of the Sangaris contingent patrol the site of a barricade in central Bangui on May 30, 2014.  Security forces fired warning shots as protesters in Bangui demanded the resignation of the interim government and the removal of foreign troops from Central African Republic on Friday, a military source said. Central Africa's interim president Friday dubbed as a "terrorist act" this week's attack on a church in the capital Bangui that killed 17 people and led to 27 others being abducted on May 28.

Marco Longari/AFP

French soldiers of the Sangaris contingent patrol the site of a barricade in central Bangui. Security forces fired warning shots as protesters in Bangui demanded the resignation of the interim government and the removal of foreign troops from Central African Republic on Friday

People angered by an attack on a church ...People angered by an attack on a church in central Bangui hold a sign (L) reading "No! To Burundian MISCA" as they protest near a barricade of burning tyres in the Bea-Rex district of Bangui on May 29, 2014. At least 15 people, including a priest, were killed and several others wounded in clashes on May 28 in the capital of the strife-torn Central African Republic, a military source said. Deeply impoverished Central Africa has been in crisis since the Seleka alliance seized power in a March 2013 coup led by Michael Djotodia. AFP PHOTO / MARCO LONGARIMARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images

Marco Longari/AFP/Getty

People angered by an attack on a church in central Bangui, the capital of the strife-torn Central African Republic, take part in a protest. At least 15 people, including a priest, were killed and several others wounded in clashes on Wednesday, a military source said 

A Muslim girl takes refuge in a Koranic school in the majority Muslim neighbourhood "5 Kilo," in Bangui, Central African Republic, February 24, 2014. About 50 Muslims are displaced in the school waiting to be moved to a safer location.

Camille Lepage/Reuters

A Muslim girl takes refuge in a Koranic school in the majority Muslim neighbourhood 5 Kilo, in Bangui, Central African Republic. About 50 Muslims are displaced in the school waiting to be moved to a safer location.

French troops of the "Operation Sangaris" man a position at a checkpoint in Bangui's PK12 area, Central African Republic, on February 18, 2014. Eight people, including six civilians, have been killed in a firefight between African peacekeepers and fighters from the mainly Christian "anti-balaka" militia, a police source said on February 18.

Fred Dufour/AFP

Operation Sangaris French troops man a position at a checkpoint in Bangui’s PK12 area, Central African Republic

A woman runs for cover as heavy gunfire erupts in the Miskin district of Bangui, Central African Republic, Monday Feb. 3, 2014. In what a French soldier on the scene describes as the heaviest exchange of fire he'd seen since early December 2013, Muslim militias engaged Burundi troops who returned fire. A third source of firing remained unidentified. Fighting between Muslim Seleka militias and Christian anti-Balaka factions continues as French and African Union forces struggle to contain the bloodshed.

Jerome Delay/AP

A woman runs for cover as heavy gunfire erupts in the Miskin district of Bangui, Central African Republic. In what a French soldier on the scene describes as the heaviest exchange of fire he had seen since early December, Muslim militias engaged Burundi troops who returned fire.

A French soldier of Operation Sangaris asks a man to put down his hammer and shovel during a patrol in Bangui on January 29, 2014. Gunfire erupted on January 29 in Bangui, still plagued by looting despite the security operations of French and African soldiers, now awaiting the reinforcement of a European force whose engagement has been authorized by the United Nations.

Issouf Sanogo/AFP

A French soldier of Operation Sangaris asks a man to put down his hammer and shovel during a patrol in Bangui. Gunfire erupted on Wednesday in the Central African Republic capital, which remains plagued by looting despite the security operations of French and African soldiers, now awaiting the reinforcement from a European force whose engagement has been authorised by the UN.

Christian residents jubilate as Seleka Muslim militias evacuate the Kasai camp in Bangui, Central African Republic, Tuesday Jan. 28, 2014, to relocate and join other Selekas at the PK11camp. The departure of the fighters was greeted with screams of joy from the crowd of hundreds that gathered to watch them leave for another camp in northern Bangui.  We are free! This is our new year!  they shouted. Seleka became deeply unpopular after they killed and tortured civilians after seizing power in March 2013. Their leader Michel Djotodia stepped down as president earlier this month and went into exile in Benin.

Jerome Delay/AP

Christian residents jubilate as Séléka Muslim militias evacuate the Kasai camp in Bangui, Central African Republic, to relocate and join other Sélékas at the PK11camp. The departure of the fighters was greeted with screams of joy from the crowd of hundreds who gathered to watch them leave for another camp in northern Bangui.

An anti-balaka militiaman poses for a photograph on the outskirts of the capital of the Central African Republic Bangui. REUTERS/Siegfried Modola

Siegfried Modola/Reuters

An armed anti-balaka militiaman poses on the outskirts of the capital Bangui in the Central African Republic

Two girls wash a pan in the displaced camp near Mpoko airport, on January 15, 2014 in Bangui. Few people are going back home as the situation is more quiet in the Centrafrican capital. The Central African Republic began the search for a peacemaker president after months of sectarian violence that displaced a fifth of the population. A terrifying spiral of atrocities pitted Muslims against the Christian majority.

Eric Feferberg/AFP

A displaced camp near Mpoko airport on Wednesday in Bangui. Few people are going back home even as the situation grows less tense in the Central African capital.

A packed taxi drives past a French checkpoint in Bangui, Central African Republic, Monday Dec. 16, 2013. Over 1600 French troops have been deployed to the country in an effort to put an end to sectarian violence.  More than 600 people have been killed since Anti-Balaka launched a strike over Bangui last week before being pushed back.

Jerome Delay/AP

A packed taxi drives past a French checkpoint in Bangui, Central African Republic on Monday. Over 1,600 French troops have been deployed to the country in an effort to put an end to sectarian violence. More than 600 people have been killed since Christian groups known as the Anti-Balaka – balaka means machete – launched a strike over Bangui last week before being pushed back.