beekeeping

The Wider Image: Bee-sting therapy...A Palestinian beekeeper uses smoke to calm bees in the process of collecting honey at a farm in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip April 11, 2016. Rateb Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem   SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES  TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Suhaib Salem/Reuters

A Palestinian beekeeper uses smoke to calm bees in the process of collecting honey at a farm in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip

She shakes off bees after an attempt to cover his body with bees in Chongqing municipality

Reuters/China Daily

She Ping, a 34-year-old beekeeper, shakes off bees after an attempt to cover his body with bees in Chongqing municipality. He used queen bees to successfully attract more than 460,000 bees, weighing over 45 kg.