Cyclone Mahasen

A Muslim Rohingya man works on constructing a tent after arriving back to a camp for iternally displaced people in the village of Mansi on the outskirts of Sittwe on May 17, 2013.  Bangladesh and Myanmar cleaned up on May 17 after a killer cyclone wrecked thousands of homes, relieved that the damage was not much worse after the storm weakened as it made landfall. At least 40 people were either killed by Cyclone Mahasen or while trying to flee its impact, including 25 Muslim Rohingya whose bodies washed up on the shores of Bangladesh after their boat capsized while sailing from Myanmar.

Soe Than Win/AFP

A Muslim Rohingya man works on constructing a tent after arriving back to a camp for internally displaced people in the village of Mansi on the outskirts of Sittwe, Myanmar, on Friday. After a killer cyclone wrecked thousands of homes, Bangladesh and Myanmar were relieved that the damage was not much worse after the storm weakened as it made landfall. At least 40 people were either killed by Cyclone Mahasen or while trying to flee its impact, including 25 Muslim Rohingya whose bodies washed up on the shores of Bangladesh after their boat capsized while sailing from Myanmar.

Internally displaced Rohingya women sit in the back of a truck ready to leave their camp in Sittwe, northwestern Rakhine State, Myanmar, Thursday, May 16, 2013. Tens of thousands of displaced Rohingya people live in the plastic-roofed tents and huts made of reeds, and they distrust nearly any order from a government that barely acknowledges they exist. Even as rain and wind from the edges of Cyclone Mahasen began to pelt the coast near the city on Thursday morning, most people camped there appeared to be staying put. Some, however, were taking down their tents and hauling their belongings away in cycle-rickshaws, or carrying them in bags balanced on their heads. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

Internally displaced Rohingya women sit in the back of a truck ready to leave their camp in Sittwe, northwestern Rakhine State, Myanmar on Thursday. Tens of thousands of displaced Rohingya people who live in the plastic-roofed tents and reed huts distrust orders from a government that barely acknowledges their exist. So even as rain and wind from the edges of cyclone Mahasen began to pelt the coast near the city on Thursday morning, most people camped there appeared to be staying put. Some, however, were taking down their tents and hauling their belongings away in cycle-rickshaws, or carrying them in bags balanced on their heads