cyclone

A young boy plays amongst a destroyed ba...A young boy plays amongst a destroyed banana plantation in Mele, outside the Vanuatu capital of Port Vila on March 19, 2015, after Cyclone Pam ripped through the island nation. Vanuatu has hit out at aid groups swarming the cyclone-ravaged Pacific nation over a lack of coordination, which it said cost precious time getting help to those in need, while warning food will run out in a week.    AFP PHOTO / Jeremy PIPERJEREMY PIPER/AFP/Getty Images

Jeremy Piper/AFP/Getty

A young boy plays amongst a destroyed banana plantation in Mele, outside the Vanuatu capital of Port Vila, after Cyclone Pam ripped through the island nation. Vanuatu has hit out at aid groups swarming the cyclone-ravaged Pacific nation over a lack of coordination, which it said cost precious time getting help to those in need, while warning food will run out in a week. 

Paul Alexander Hatyay (C), the headmaster, and teachers of Central School lay out books to dry in the sun after the roof of the school's library was blown away by Cyclone Pam in Port Vila, the capital city of the Pacific island nation of Vanuatu March 18, 2015.   REUTERS/Edgar Su     REUTERS NEWS PICTURES HAS NOW MADE IT EASIER TO FIND THE BEST PHOTOS FROM THE MOST IMPORTANT STORIES AND TOP STANDALONES EACH DAY. Search for "TPX" in the IPTC Supplemental Category field or "IMAGES OF THE DAY" in the Caption field and you will find a selection of 80-100 of our daily Top Pictures.

Edgar Su/Reuters

Paul Alexander Hatyay (C), the headmaster, and teachers of Central School lay out books to dry in the sun after the roof of the school’s library was blown away by Cyclone Pam in Port Vila, the capital city of the Pacific island nation of Vanuatu. 

Internally displaced Rohingya women sit in the back of a truck ready to leave their camp in Sittwe, northwestern Rakhine State, Myanmar, Thursday, May 16, 2013. Tens of thousands of displaced Rohingya people live in the plastic-roofed tents and huts made of reeds, and they distrust nearly any order from a government that barely acknowledges they exist. Even as rain and wind from the edges of Cyclone Mahasen began to pelt the coast near the city on Thursday morning, most people camped there appeared to be staying put. Some, however, were taking down their tents and hauling their belongings away in cycle-rickshaws, or carrying them in bags balanced on their heads. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

Internally displaced Rohingya women sit in the back of a truck ready to leave their camp in Sittwe, northwestern Rakhine State, Myanmar on Thursday. Tens of thousands of displaced Rohingya people who live in the plastic-roofed tents and reed huts distrust orders from a government that barely acknowledges their exist. So even as rain and wind from the edges of cyclone Mahasen began to pelt the coast near the city on Thursday morning, most people camped there appeared to be staying put. Some, however, were taking down their tents and hauling their belongings away in cycle-rickshaws, or carrying them in bags balanced on their heads

Rohingya women sit in front of their rel...Rohingya women sit in front of their relief tent at the Mansi Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camp on the outskirts of Sittwe on May 15, 2013. A cyclone threatening to lash low-lying coastal areas of Bangladesh and Myanmar appears to have weakened, but still poses a risk to more than eight million people, according to the UN.  AFP PHOTO / SOE THAN WINSoe Than WIN/AFP/Getty Images

Soe Than Win/AFP

Rohingya women sit in front of their relief tent at the Mansi Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camp on the outskirts of Sittwe on Wednesday. A cyclone threatening to lash low-lying coastal areas of Bangladesh and Myanmar appears to have weakened, but still poses a risk to more than 8 million people, according to the UN. 

An internally displaced Rohingya boy wraps himself with a sarong as he walks in rain at a makeshift camp for Rohingya people in Sittwe, northwestern Rakhine State, Myanmar, ahead of the arrival of Cyclone Mahasen, Tuesday, May 14, 2013. The U.N. said the cyclone, expected later this week, could swamp makeshift housing camps sheltering tens of thousands of Rohingya.  Myanmar state television reported Monday that 5,158 people were relocated from low-lying camps in Rakhine state to safer shelters. But far more people are considered vulnerable.

Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

A Rohingya boy wraps himself with a sarong as he walks in the rain at a makeshift camp for displaced Rohingya people in Sittwe, northwestern Rakhine, Myanmar, ahead of Cyclone Mahasen. The UN said the cyclone, expected later this week, could swamp makeshift housing camps sheltering tens of thousands of Rohingya.