Darfur

A displaced mother and her child inspect the remnants of their burnt house in Khor Abeche

Albert Gonzalez Farran/Reuters

A displaced mother and her child inspect the remnants of their burnt home in Khor Abeche, South Darfur.

TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY IAN TIMBERLAKE  ...TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY IAN TIMBERLAKE  A handout picture released by the United Nations-African Union Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) shows Suleiman Fatul Saim, 10, from Dar al-Salam in North Darfur, posing for a picture in El-Fasher, the administrative capital of North Darfur, on April 2, 2013. Suleiman suffered burns to more than 90 percent of his body when his brother detonated a device found near their house in November 2006 as they planned to celebrate the victory of their football team in an accident that left one of their friends dead. From aircraft bombs to cluster munitions and grenades, the Ordnance Disposal Office of the international peacekeeping force in Sudan's war-torn Darfur has found and destroyed them all. But for every piece of unexploded weaponry the ODO eliminates, worsening fighting means that other munitions will take their place, posing a threat to farmers and peacekeepers alike. AFP PHOTO/UNAMID/ALBERT GONZALEZ FARRAN  == RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO/UNAMID/ALBERT GONZALEZ FARRAN" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

Albert Gonzalez/AFP

A handout picture released by the United Nations-African Union Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) shows Suleiman Fatul Saim, 10, from Dar al-Salam in North Darfur, posing for a picture in El-Fasher, the administrative capital of North Darfur. Suleiman suffered burns to more than 90 percent of his body when his brother detonated a device found near their house in November 2006 as they planned to celebrate the victory of their football team in an accident that left one of their friends dead. From aircraft bombs to cluster munitions and grenades, the Ordnance Disposal Office of the international peacekeeping force in Sudan’s war-torn Darfur has found and destroyed them all. But for every piece of unexploded weaponry the ODO eliminates, worsening fighting means that other munitions will take their place, posing a threat to farmers and peacekeepers alike.