drugs

A Pakistani paramilitary soldier stands guard beside a burning pile of seized drugs during a ceremony to mark International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking on the outskirts of Peshawar on June 26, 2014. Pakistan's war-torn neighbour Afghanistan is the world's largest producer of opium, the raw material for heroin. Efforts to cut production have failed in the 13 years since US-led forces toppled the Taliban regime there. More than 45 percent of Afghanistan's illicit opiates pass through Pakistan on their way to markets in Europe and Asia, according to the UN Office on Drugs and Crime.

A Majeed/AFP

A Pakistani paramilitary soldier stands guard beside a burning pile of seized drugs during a ceremony to mark International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking on the outskirts of Peshawar on Thursday

Drug users gather beneath an overpass in an area known as 'Cracolandia', or Crackland, in the Antares shantytown in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. According to the Economist, recent studies have shown Brazil to be the world's largest crack market, with 1-1.2 million users.

Mario Tama/Getty Images

Drug users gather beneath an overpass in an area known as “Cracolandia”, or Crackland, in the Antares shantytown in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Incineration of some 100 tons of illicit drugs in Tehran...epa03760397 Iranian police are seen in front of a cloud of smoke rising from a pile of drugs set to fire during an incineration ceremony of some 100 tons of illicit drugs in an annual ritual in Tehran, Iran, 26 June 2013, aimed at preventing drug trafficking and drug use. The drugs, mainly opium and morphine, were set ablaze in front of Tehran police and judiciary officials as well as a number of foreign dignitaries and United Nations officials.  EPA/ABEDIN TAHERKENAREH

Abedin Taherkenareh/EPA

Iranian police on Wednesday stand in front of a cloud of smoke during an incineration ceremony of about 100 tons of illicit drugs, an annual ritual in Tehran aimed at preventing drug trafficking and drug use. The drugs, mainly opium and morphine, were set ablaze in front of police and judiciary officials as well as a number of foreign dignitaries and UN officials

Afghan farmers collect raw opium as they work in a poppy field in Khogyani district of Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan, Friday, May 10, 2013. Opium poppy cultivation has been increasing for a third year in a row and is heading for a record high, the U.N. said in a report. Poppy cultivation is also dramatically increasing in areas of the southern Taliban heartland, the report showed, especially in regions where thousands of U.S.-led coalition troops have been withdrawn or are in the process of departing. The report indicates that whatever international efforts have been made to wean local farmers off the crop have failed.

Rahmat Gul/AP

Afghan farmers collect raw opium as they work in a poppy field in Khogyani district of Jalalabad, east of Kabul in Afghanistan. Opium poppy cultivation has been increasing for a third year in a row and is heading for a record high, the UN said in a report. Poppy cultivation is also increasing in areas of the southern Taliban heartland, the report showed, especially in regions where thousands of US-led coalition troops have been withdrawn or are in the process of departing. The report indicates that whatever international efforts have been made to wean local farmers off the crop have failed.